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Commands using printf from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using printf - 160 results
while cat energy_now; do sleep 1; done |awk -v F=$(cat energy_full) -v C=60 'NR==1{P=B=$1;p=100/F} {d=$1-P; if(d!=0&&d*D<=0){D=d;n=1;A[0]=B=P}; if(n>0){r=g=($1-B)/n;if(n>C){r=($1-A[n%C])/C}}; A[n++%C]=P=$1; printf "%3d %+09.5f %+09.5f\n", p*$1, p*g, p*r}'
2015-09-19 15:45:40
User: sqweek
Functions: awk cat printf sleep

Needs to be run in a battery sysfs dir, eg. /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0 on my system.

Displays the battery's current charge and the rate per-second at which energy is {dis,}charging. All values are displayed as percentages of "full" charge.

The first column is the current charge. The second is the rate of change averaged over the entire lifetime of the command (or since the AC cable was {un,}plugged), and the third column is the rate of change averaged over the last minute (controlled by the C=60 variable passed to awk).

The sample output captures a scenario where I ran 'yes' in another terminal to max out a CPU. My battery was at 76% charge and you can see the energy drain starts to rise above 0.01% per-second as the cpu starts working and the fan kicks in etc. While idle it was more like 0.005% per-second.

I tried to use this to estimate the remaining battery life/time until fully charged, but found it to be pretty useless... As my battery gets more charged it starts to charge slower, which meant the estimate was always wrong. Not sure if that's common for batteries or not.

du -x --max-depth=1|sort -rn|awk -F / -v c=$COLUMNS 'NR==1{t=$1} NR>1{r=int($1/t*c+.5); b="\033[1;31m"; for (i=0; i<r; i++) b=b"#"; printf " %5.2f%% %s\033[0m %s\n", $1/t*100, b, $2}'|tac
2015-09-12 10:36:49
Functions: awk du printf sort

A more efficient way, with reversed order to put the focus in the big ones.

printf "\e[7m%-`tput cols`s\e[0m\n" "Full width highlighted line"
2015-01-08 16:17:43
User: fr00tyl00p
Functions: printf

Show a full terminal line inverted with custom text.

printf "%s\t%s\t%s\n" {1..9} '*' 0 '#'
2014-12-27 11:27:24
User: flatcap
Functions: printf
Tags: printf

Draw a telephone keyboard, using just a shell built-in command.

FILE=somefile.js; LOG=~/changes.diff; truncate -s0 ${LOG}; for change in $(svn log ${FILE} | awk -F' | ' '/^r[0-9]+/{print $1}'); do svn log -c ${change} >> ${LOG}; printf "\n" >> ${LOG}; svn diff -c ${change} >> ${LOG}; printf "\n\n\n" >> ${LOG}; done
2014-12-23 20:00:54
User: hochmeister
Functions: awk diff printf
Tags: svn diff log

from a svn repo, print a log, with diff, of each commit touching a given file

history|awk '{print $2}'|sort|uniq -c|sort -rn|head -30|awk '!max{max=$1;}{r="";i=s=100*$1/max;while(i-->0)r=r"#";printf "%50s %5d %s %s",$2,$1,r,"\n";}'
2014-09-29 12:40:43
User: injez
Functions: awk head printf sort uniq

Top 30 History Command line with histogram display

find . -name "*.pdf" -print0 | xargs -r0 stat -c %y\ %n | sort|awk '{print $4}'|gawk 'BEGIN{ a=1 }{ printf "mv %s %04d.pdf\n", $0, a++ }' | bash
2014-09-23 06:40:45
Functions: awk find gawk printf stat xargs
Tags: sort awk find xargs

Caution: distructive overwrite of filenames

Useful for concatenating pdfs in date order using pdftk

hl() { while read -r; do printf '%s\n' "$(perl -p -e 's/('"$1"')/\a\e[7m$1\e[0m/g' <<< "$REPLY")"; done; }
message="I have a nice easy typing pace"; for ((i=0; i<${#message}; i++)); do echo "after 200" | tclsh; printf "${message:$i:1}"; done; echo;
find -type f -iregex '.*\.\(mkv\|mp4\|wmv\|flv\|webm\|mov\|dat\|flv\)' -print0 | xargs -0 mplayer -vo dummy -ao dummy -identify 2>/dev/null | perl -nle '/ID_LENGTH=([0-9\.]+)/ && ($t +=$1) && printf "%02d:%02d:%02d\n",$t/3600,$t/60%60,$t%60' | tail -n 1
2014-06-07 15:50:41
User: powerinside
Functions: find perl printf tail xargs

Use case insensitive regex to match files ending in popular video format extensions and calculate their total time. (traverses all files recursively starting from the current directory)

MYURL=http://test.example.com ; awk -F/ '{ print $3 }' <<< $MYURL | awk -F. '{ if ( $(NF-1) == "co" || $(NF-1) == "com" ) printf $(NF-2)"."; print $(NF-1)"."$(NF); }'
2014-05-26 07:31:40
User: snafu
Functions: awk printf
Tags: bash url domain

Extracts domain and subdomain from given URl. See examples.

lspci -vv | grep 'Ethernet\|Serial' | awk 'NR == 1{ printf $1 } NR == 2 { print " mac " $7 }' | sed ?e 's/-/:/g' -e 's/:f[ef]:f[ef]//g' -e 's/01:00.0/eth0/g' -e 's/01:00.1/eth1/g' -e 's/01:00.2/eth2/g' -e 's/01:00.3/eth3/g' > /etc/iftab && ifrename
2014-03-01 20:07:18
Functions: awk grep lspci printf sed

for redhat systems works sometimes :S tested on dell poweredge r7+ systems

printf -- " -e %s" ${ARRAY[*]}
2014-02-25 03:34:12
User: SEJeff
Functions: printf

[jeff@omniscience container] (master)$ echo docker run $(printf -- " -e %s" ${DOCKER_APP_VARS[*]}) -name 12factorapp mattdm/fedora-small

docker run -e DATABASE_USER=dbuserro, -e DATABASE_PASSWORD=maipass -name 12factorapp mattdm/fedora-small

Note that the printf method by itsself doesn't include a newline (\n), so you'll need to embed it into an echo statement or something that does.

function b58encode () { local b58_lookup_table=({1..9} {A..H} {J..N} {P..Z} {a..k} {m..z}); bc<<<"obase=58;ibase=16;${1^^}"|(read -a s; for b58_index in "${s[@]}" ; do printf %s ${b58_lookup_table[ 10#"$b58_index" ]}; done); }

A bitcoin "brainwallet" is a secret passphrase you carry in your brain.

The Bitcoin Brainwallet Private Key Base58 Encoder is the third of three functions needed to calculate a bitcoin PRIVATE key from your "brainwallet" passphrase.

This base58 encoder uses the obase parameter of the amazing bc utility to convert from ASCII-hex to base58. Tech note: bc inserts line continuation backslashes, but the "read s" command automatically strips them out.

I hope that one day base58 will, like base64, be added to the amazing openssl utility.

function brainwallet_exponent () { printf %s "$1"|sha256sum|head -c 64; }
2014-02-18 01:49:09
User: nixnax
Functions: head printf

A bitcoin "brainwallet" is a secret passphrase you carry in your brain.

The Bitcoin Brainwallet Exponent Calculator is one of three functions needed to calculate the bitcoin PRIVATE key. Roughly, the formula is exponent = sha256 (passphrase)

Note that this is a bash function, which means you have to type its name to invoke it.

You can check the accuracy of the results here http://brainwallet.org

YYYY=2014; MM=02; for d in $(cal $MM $YYYY | grep "^ *[0-9]"); do DD=$(printf "%02d" $d); echo $YYYY$MM$DD; done
2014-02-06 11:31:57
User: fibo
Functions: cal echo grep printf
Tags: cal for loop

Edit YYYY and MM at the beginning of the command with the year and month you want.

Note that `DD=$(printf "%02d" $d)` will pad single digit integers with a leading zero.

Substitute `echo $YYYY$MM$DD` at the end of the line with the command you want to launch, for instance

script.pl --yyyymmdd $YYYY$MM$DD

prepend () { array=("$@"); len=${#array[@]}; file=${array[$len-1]}; text=${array[@]:0:$len-1}; printf '%s\n' 0a "$text" . w | ed -s "$file"; }
2013-12-09 21:59:26
User: zlemini
Functions: ed printf
Tags: sed replace


$ prepend content to add [filename]

Uses ed, so no temp files created.

yes 'c=(" " " " " " 0 1); printf "${c[RANDOM%5]}"' | bash
for m in `df -P | awk -F ' ' '{print $NF}' | sed -e "1d"`;do n=`df -P | grep "$m$" | awk -F ' ' '{print $5}' | cut -d% -f1`;i=0;if [[ $n =~ ^-?[0-9]+$ ]];then printf '%-25s' $m;while [ $i -lt $n ];do echo -n '=';let "i=$i+1";done;echo " $n";fi;done
2013-07-29 20:12:39
User: drockney
Functions: awk cut echo grep printf sed
Tags: bash

Automatically drops mount points that have non-numeric sizes (e.g. /proc). Tested in bash on Linux and AIX.

while read X ; do printf "$X --"; virsh dumpxml $X | egrep "source dev|source file"; done< <(virsh list | awk '$1 ~ /^[1-9]/ { print $2 }')
2013-07-29 17:32:59
User: hugme
Functions: awk egrep printf read

This will strip out the relivent disk information from kvm. I'm using it to find disks on a SAN which are no longer in use.

printf "\ec"
2013-05-29 18:10:22
User: soroosh
Functions: printf

clear command doesn't actually clear the terminal because if you scroll you can still see output from the previous commands. Using this command you can clear your terminal screen as well as buffer.

alias clearscrollback='clear;printf %b "\033[3J"'
count='1'; for i in *.jpg; do mv $i $(printf '%01d'.jpg $count); (( count++ )); done
2013-02-20 06:38:25
User: lalanza808
Functions: mv printf

The '1' in '%01d' changes the amounts of digits in the integer, eg. 1 vs 0001.

awk '{for (i=9;i<=NF;i++) {printf "%s",$i; printf "%s", " ";}; printf "\n"}'
2013-02-12 13:57:43
User: adimania
Functions: awk printf
Tags: awk

It'll print the file names preserving the spaces in their names and adding new line after every new filename.

I wrote this to quickly find out how many files in any directory is owned by a particular user. This can be extended using pipe and grep to do much more.

find . -name '*.jpg' | awk 'BEGIN{ a=0 }{ printf "mv %s name%01d.jpg\n", $0, a++ }' | bash
2013-02-07 06:12:37
User: doublescythe
Functions: awk find printf

This command will take the files in a directory, rename them, and then number them from 1...N.

Black belt stuff.

Hell of a time saver.