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Commands tagged tput from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged tput - 19 results
perl -E 'say $_,`tput setb $_`," "x(`tput cols`-length("$_")),`tput sgr0` for 0..(`tput colors`-1)'
2012-11-22 01:55:51
User: MarxBro
Functions: perl
Tags: perl color tput
3

Using perl and tput, show all the colors with numbers that your actual $TERM can handle.

If want to remove the numbers at beginning of new line, it should be something like this:

perl -E 'say `tput setb $_`," "x `tput cols`, `tput sgr0` for 0 .. (`tput colors` - 1)'
hourglass(){ trap 'tput cnorm' 0 1 2 15 RETURN;local s=$(($SECONDS +$1));(tput civis;while (($SECONDS<$s));do for f in '|' '\' '-' '/';do echo -n "$f";sleep .2s;echo -n $'\b';done;done;);}
2012-06-21 05:40:22
User: AskApache
Functions: echo sleep tput trap
14

Displays an animated hourglass for x amount of seconds

alias tail='tail -n $((${LINES:-`tput lines 2>/dev/null||echo -n 80`} - 7))'
2012-03-22 02:44:11
User: AskApache
Functions: alias echo
2

Run the alias command, then issue

ps aux | tail

and resize your terminal window (putty/console/hyperterm/xterm/etc) then issue the same command and you'll understand.

${LINES:-`tput lines 2>/dev/null||echo -n 12`}

Insructs the shell that if LINES is not set or null to use the output from `tput lines` ( ncurses based terminal access ) to get the number of lines in your terminal. But furthermore, in case that doesn't work either, it will default to using the default of 80.

The default for TAIL is to output the last 10 lines, this alias changes the default to output the last x lines instead, where x is the number of lines currently displayed on your terminal - 7. The -7 is there so that the top line displayed is the command you ran that used TAIL, ie the prompt.

Depending on whether your PS1 and/or PROMPT_COMMAND output more than 1 line (mine is 3) you will want to increase from -2. So with my prompt being the following, I need -7, or - 5 if I only want to display the commandline at the top. ( http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash-power-prompt.html )

275MB/748MB

[7995:7993 - 0:186] 06:26:49 Thu Apr 08 [askapache@n1-backbone5:/dev/pts/0 +1] ~

In most shells the LINES variable is created automatically at login and updated when the terminal is resized (28 linux, 23/20 others for SIGWINCH) to contain the number of vertical lines that can fit in your terminal window. Because the alias doesn't hard-code the current LINES but relys on the $LINES variable, this is a dynamic alias that will always work on a tty device.

println() {echo -n -e "\e[038;05;${2:-255}m";printf "%$(tput cols)s"|sed "s/ /${1:-=}/g"}
2011-01-09 18:08:18
User: joedhon
Functions: printf sed
Tags: sed tput printf
0

function for .bash_aliases that prints a line of the character of your choice in the color of your choice across the terminal.

Default character is "=", default color is white.

for p in `ps L|cut -d' ' -f1`;do echo -e "`tput clear;read -p$p -n1 p`";ps wwo pid:6,user:8,comm:10,$p kpid -A;done
2

While going through the source code for the well known ps command, I read about some interesting things.. Namely, that there are a bunch of different fields that ps can try and enumerate for you. These are fields I was not able to find in the man pages, documentation, only in the source.

Here is a longer function that goes through each of the formats recognized by the ps on your machine, executes it, and then prompts you whether you would like to add it or not. Adding it simply adds it to an array that is then printed when you ctrl-c or at the end of the function run. This lets you save your favorite ones and then see the command to put in your .bash_profile like mine at : http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Note that I had to do the exec method below in order to pause with read.

t ()

{

local r l a P f=/tmp/ps c='command ps wwo pid:6,user:8,vsize:8,comm:20' IFS=' ';

trap 'exec 66

exec 66 $f && command ps L | tr -s ' ' >&$f;

while read -u66 l >&/dev/null; do

a=${l/% */};

$c,$a k -${a//%/} -A;

yn "Add $a" && P[$SECONDS]=$a;

done

}

( x=`tput op` y=`printf %$((${COLUMNS}-6))s`;for i in {0..256};do o=00$i;echo -e ${o:${#o}-3:3} `tput setaf $i;tput setab $i`${y// /=}$x;done; )
6

This is super fast and an easy way to test your terminal for 256 color support. Unlike alot of info about changing colors in the terminal, this uses the ncurses termcap/terminfo database to determine the escape codes used to generate the colors for a specific TERM. That means you can switch your terminal and then run this to check the real output.

tset xterm-256color

at any rate that is some super lean code!

Here it is in function form to stick in your .bash_profile

aa_256 ()

{

( x=`tput op` y=`printf %$((${COLUMNS}-6))s`;

for i in {0..256};

do

o=00$i;

echo -e ${o:${#o}-3:3} `tput setaf $i;tput setab $i`${y// /=}$x;

done )

}

From my bash_profile: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

L(){ l=`builtin printf %${2:-$COLUMNS}s` && echo -e "${l// /${1:-=}}"; }
2

One of the first functions programmers learn is how to print a line. This is my 100% bash builtin function to do it, which makes it as optimal as a function can be. The COLUMNS environment variable is also set by bash (including bash resetting its value when you resize your term) so its very efficient. I like pretty-output in my shells and have experimented with several ways to output a line the width of the screen using a minimal amount of code. This is like version 9,000 lol.

This function is what I use, though when using colors or other terminal features I create separate functions that call this one, since this is the lowest level type of function. It might be better named printl(), but since I use it so much it's more optimal to have the name contain less chars (both for my programming and for the internal workings).

If you do use terminal escapes this will reset to default.

tput sgr0

For implementation ideas, check my

http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

shmore(){ local l L M="`echo;tput setab 4&&tput setaf 7` --- SHMore --- `tput sgr0`";L=2;while read l;do echo "${l}";((L++));[[ "$L" == "${LINES:-80}" ]]&&{ L=2;read -p"$M" -u1;echo;};done;}
2010-04-21 00:40:37
User: AskApache
Functions: echo read
6
SH
cat mod_log_config.c | shmore

or

shmore < mod_log_config.c

Most pagers like less, more, most, and others require additional processes to be loaded, additional cpu time used, and if that wasn't bad enough, most of them modify the output in ways that can be undesirable.

What I wanted was a "more" pager that was basically the same as running:

cat file

Without modifying the output and without additional processes being created, cpu used, etc. Normally if you want to scroll the output of cat file without modifying the output I would have to scroll back my terminal or screen buffer because less modifies the output.

After looking over many examples ranging from builtin cat functions created for csh, zsh, ksh, sh, and bash from the 80's, 90s, and more recent examples shipped with bash 4, and after much trial and error, I finally came up with something that satisifed my objective. It automatically adjusts to the size of your terminal window by using the LINES variable (or 80 lines if that is empty) so

This is a great function that will work as long as your shell works, so it will work just find if you are booted in single user mode and your /usr/bin directory is missing (where less and other pagers can be). Using builtins like this is fantastic and is comparable to how busybox works, as long as your shell works this will work.

One caveat/note: I always have access to a color terminal, and I always setup both the termcap and the terminfo packages for color terminals (and/or ncurses and slang), so for that reason I stuck the

tput setab 4; tput setaf 7

command at the beginning of the function, so it only runs 1 time, and that causes the -- SHMore -- prompt to have a blue background and bright white text.

This is one of hundreds of functions I have in my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html">.bash_profile at http://www.askapache.com/">AskApache.com, but actually won't be included till the next update.

If you can improve this in any way at all please let me know, I would be very grateful! ( Like one thing I want is to be able to continue to the next screen by pressing any key instead of now having to press enter to continue)

jot -b '#' -s '' $COLUMNS
2010-04-13 22:03:39
User: dennisw
Tags: tr tput printf
-1

For BSD-based systems, including OS X, that don't have seq.

This version provides a default using tput in case $COLUMNS is not set:

jot -b '#' -s '' ${COLUMNS:-$(tput cols)}
printf -v row "%${COLUMNS}s"; echo ${row// /#}
2010-04-13 21:56:46
User: dennisw
Functions: echo printf
Tags: tr tput printf
4

Pure Bash

This will print a row of characters the width of the screen without using any external executables. In some cases, COLUMNS may not be set. Here is an alternative that uses tput to generate a default if that's the case. And it still avoids using tr.

printf -v row "%${COLUMNS:-$(tput cols)}s"; echo ${row// /#}

The only disadvantage to either one is that they create a variable.

alias head='head -n $((${LINES:-`tput lines 2>/dev/null||echo -n 12`} - 2))'
26

Run the alias command, then issue

ps aux | head

and resize your terminal window (putty/console/hyperterm/xterm/etc) then issue the same command and you'll understand.

${LINES:-`tput lines 2>/dev/null||echo -n 12`}

Insructs the shell that if LINES is not set or null to use the output from `tput lines` ( ncurses based terminal access ) to get the number of lines in your terminal. But furthermore, in case that doesn't work either, it will default to using the deafault of 12 (-2 = 10).

The default for HEAD is to output the first 10 lines, this alias changes the default to output the first x lines instead, where x is the number of lines currently displayed on your terminal - 2. The -2 is there so that the top line displayed is the command you ran that used HEAD, ie the prompt.

Depending on whether your PS1 and/or PROMPT_COMMAND output more than 1 line (mine is 3) you will want to increase from -2. So with my prompt being the following, I need -7, or - 5 if I only want to display the commandline at the top. ( http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash-power-prompt.html )

275MB/748MB

[7995:7993 - 0:186] 06:26:49 Thu Apr 08 [askapache@n1-backbone5:/dev/pts/0 +1] ~

In most shells the LINES variable is created automatically at login and updated when the terminal is resized (28 linux, 23/20 others for SIGWINCH) to contain the number of vertical lines that can fit in your terminal window. Because the alias doesn't hard-code the current LINES but relys on the $LINES variable, this is a dynamic alias that will always work on a tty device.

hb(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 2;tput setab 0;tput blink`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; }
2010-04-07 08:45:26
User: AskApache
Functions: sed
-2
hb(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 2;tput setab 0;tput blink`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; }

hb blinks, hc does a reverse color with background.. both very nice.

hc(){ sed "s/\($*\)/`tput setaf 0;tput setab 6`\1`tput sgr0`/gI"; }

Run this:

command ps -Hacl -F S -A f | hc ".*$PPID.*" | hb ".*$$.*"

Your welcome ;)

From my bash profile - http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

printf "%`tput cols`s"|tr ' ' '#'
seq -s'#' 0 $(tput cols) | tr -d '[:digit:]'
2010-04-01 09:06:44
User: jgc
Functions: seq tput tr
Tags: seq tr tput
6

Print a row of characters across the terminal. Uses tput to establish the current terminal width, and generates a line of characters just long enough to cross it. In the example '#' is used.

It's possible to use a repeating sequence by dividing the columns by the number of characters in the sequence like this:

seq -s'~-' 0 $(( $(tput cols) /2 )) | tr -d '[:digit:]'

or

seq -s'-~?' 0 $(( $(tput cols) /3 )) | tr -d '[:digit:]'

You will lose chararacters at the end if the length isn't cleanly divisible.

termtrace(){( strace -s 1000 -e write tput $@ 2>&2 2>&1 ) | grep -o '"[^"]*"';}
2010-03-17 08:53:41
User: AskApache
Functions: grep strace tput write
3

Depending on the TERM, the terminfo version, ncurses version, etc.. you may be using a varied assortment of terminal escape codes. With this command you can easily find out exactly what is going on.. This is terminal escape zen!

( 2>&2 strace -f -F -e write -s 1000 sh -c 'echo -e "initc\nis2\ncnorm\nrmso\nsgr0" | tput -S' 2>&1 ) | grep -o '"\\[^"]*"' --color=always

"\33]4;%p1%d;rgb:%p2%{255}%*%{1000}%/%2.2X/%p3%{255}%*%{1000}%/%2.2X/%p4%{255}%*%{1000}%/%2.2X\33\\\33[!p\33[?3;4l\33[4l\33>\33[?12l\33[?25h\33[27m\33(B\33[m"

Lets say you want to find out what you need to echo in order to get the text to blink..

echo -e "`tput blink`This will blink`tput sgr0` This wont"

Now you can use this function instead of calling tput (tput is much smarter for portable code because it works differently depending on the current TERM, and tput -T anyterm works too.) to turn that echo into a much faster executing code. tput queries files, opens files, etc.. but echo is very strait and narrow.

So now you can do this:

echo -e "\33[5mThis will blink\33(B\33[m This wont"

More at http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

xv() { case $- in *[xv]*) set +xv;; *) set -xv ;; esac }
2010-02-14 20:57:29
User: cfajohnson
Functions: set
4

Turn shell tracing and verbosity (set -xv) on/off in any Bourne-type shell

If either -x or -v is set, the function turns them both off.

If neither is on, both are turned on.

function setx(){ sed '/[xv]/!Q2' <<< $- && { set +xv; export PS4=">>> "; } || { export PS4="`tput setaf 3`>>> `tput sgr0`"; set -xv; }; }
2010-02-14 01:25:44
User: AskApache
Functions: export sed set
1

Running this command turns shell tracing and shell verbose debugging on or off. Not only does it do that, it also uses your terminals builtin method of setting colors to make debugging much easier.

It looks at the current shell options contained in the $- special bash variable and that lets this function set the opposite of the current value. So from the shell you could do a:

setx; echo "y" | ( cat -t ) | echo "d"; setx

and it will turn on debbuggin.

This is an amazingly useful function that is perfect to add system-wide by adding it to /etc/profile or /etc/bashrc.. You can run it from the shell, and you can also use it in your shell scripts like my .bash_profile - http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

alias :q='tput setaf 1; echo >&2 "this is NOT vi(m) :/"; tput sgr0'
2009-12-08 12:59:44
User: sputnick
Functions: alias echo tput
Tags: vim alias vi tput
-1

For vi(m) users :

Add it in your ~/.bashrc

Add an "exit" @ the end if you are masochist ;)

cat /dev/urandom|awk 'BEGIN{"tput cuu1" | getline CursorUp; "tput clear" | getline Clear; printf Clear}{num+=1;printf CursorUp; print num}'
2009-07-13 07:30:51
User: axelabs
Functions: awk cat printf
Tags: nawk awk clear tput
0

awk can clear the screen while displaying output. This is a handy way of seeing how many lines a tail -f has hit or see how many files find has found. On solaris, you may have to use 'nawk' and your machine needs 'tput'