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Commands tagged ps from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged ps - 55 results
ps axo pcpu,args | awk '/[p]hp.*pool/ { sums[$4] += $1 } END { for (pool in sums) { print sums[pool], pool } }' | sort -rn | column -t
while sleep 1; do if [ $(echo "$(cat /proc/loadavg | cut -d' ' -f1) > .8 " | bc) -gt 0 ]; then echo -e "\n\a"$(date)" \e[5m"$(cat /proc/loadavg)"\e[0m"; ps aux --sort=-%cpu|head -n 5; fi; done
2014-12-08 15:44:40
User: tyzbit
Functions: cat echo head ps sleep
0

This checks the system load every second and if it's over a certain threshold (.8 in this example), it spits out the date, system loads and top 4 processes sorted by CPU.

Additionally, the \a in the first echo creates an audible bell.

PID=$(ps -ef | grep processName | grep -v grep | awk '{print $2'}); kill -9 $PID
for i in `cat hosts_list`; do RES=`ssh myusername@${i} "ps -ef " |awk '/[p]rocessname/ {print $2}'`; test "x${RES}" = "x" && echo $i; done
2014-10-03 14:57:54
User: arlequin
Functions: awk echo test
Tags: ssh awk test ps
0

Given a hosts list, ssh one by one and echo its name only if 'processname' is not running.

while true; do ps aux | sort -rk 3,3 | head -n 11 | cut -c -120 | netcat -l -p 8888 2>&1 >/dev/null; done &
2014-08-29 07:10:57
User: manumiu
Functions: cut head ps sort
0

If you want to see your top ten cpu using processes from the browser (e.g. you don't want to ssh into your server all the time for checking system load) you can run this command and browse to the machines ip on port 8888. For example 192.168.0.100:8888

ps -eo etime,pid,pcpu,ppid,args | sed -e '/\[.\+\]/d' -e '/^[ \t]*[0-9]\{2\}:[0-9]\{2\} /d' | sort -k1r
2014-02-14 00:22:31
User: neurodrone
Functions: ps sed sort
0

If you have ever been trying to look for a list of processes based on their elapsed time you don't need to look any further.

This command lets you find the list of processes ordered in a reversed order (oldest at the top) that have been running for over an hour on your system. Any system processes are filtered out, leaving only user initiated ones in. I find it extremely useful for debugging and performance analysis.

ps r -A
psgrep() { ps aux | tee >(head -1>&2) | grep -v " grep $@" | grep "$@" -i --color=auto; }
2013-08-02 12:44:32
User: fnl
Functions: grep head ps tee
Tags: grep ps
0

Pipes the header row of ps to STDERR, then greps for the command on the output of ps, removing the grep entry before that.

pgrep -lf
ps aux | grep $(echo $1 | sed "s/^\(.\)/[\1]/g")
2013-07-16 10:10:51
User: opexxx
Functions: echo grep ps sed
Tags: sed grep ps
1

grep по ps aux

ps auxw | grep sbin/apache | awk '{print"-p " $2}' | xargs strace -f
2013-02-19 19:14:57
User: msealand
Functions: awk grep ps strace xargs
1

This version also attaches to new processes forked by the parent apache process. That way you can trace all current and *future* apache processes.

ps -eo size,pid,user,command --sort -size |awk '{hr[1024**2]="GB";hr[1024]="MB";for (x=1024**3; x>=1024; x/=1024){if ($1>=x){printf ("%-6.2f %s ", $1/x, hr[x]);break}}}{printf ("%-6s %-10s ", $2, $3)}{for (x=4;x<=NF;x++){printf ("%s ",$x)} print ("\n")}'
NUMCPUS=`grep ^proc /proc/cpuinfo | wc -l`; FIRST=`cat /proc/stat | awk '/^cpu / {print $5}'`; sleep 1; SECOND=`cat /proc/stat | awk '/^cpu / {print $5}'`; USED=`echo 2 k 100 $SECOND $FIRST - $NUMCPUS / - p | dc`; echo ${USED}% CPU Usage
2012-10-02 03:57:51
User: toxick
Functions: awk echo sleep wc
0

Using the output of 'ps' to determine CPU usage is misleading, as the CPU column in 'ps' shows CPU usage per process over the entire lifetime of the process. In order to get *current* CPU usage (without scraping a top screen) you need to pull some numbers from /proc/stat. Here, we take two readings, once second apart, determine how much IDLE time was spent across all CPUs, divide by the number of CPUs, and then subtract from 100 to get non-idle time.

top -p $(pgrep -d , foo)
top '-p' $(pgrep -d ' -p ' foo)
top $(pgrep foo | sed 's|^|-p |g')
2012-06-14 15:13:00
User: michelsberg
Functions: sed top
5
pgrep foo

may return several pids for process foobar footy01 etc. like this:

11427

12576

12577

sed puts "-p " in front and we pass a list to top:

top -p 11427 -p 12576 -p 12577
ps h --ppid $(cat /var/run/apache2.pid) | awk '{print"-p " $1}' | xargs sudo strace
2012-03-21 01:59:41
Functions: awk cat ps sudo xargs
2

Like the original version except it does not include the parent apache process or the grep process and adds "sudo" so it can be run by user.

exec -a "/sbin/getty 38400 tty7" your_cmd -erase_all_files
2012-02-01 10:54:03
User: mhs
Functions: exec
16
exec -a $NAME $COMMAND $ARGS

`your_cmd -erase_all_files` is the real process, but harmless-looking getty appears in the process table.

Never actually had a need to do this, but interesting nonetheless... Tested in bash, dash.

-a $NAME

"pass NAME as the zeroth argument to COMMAND", i.e. customise the name of the process (as commonly seen with `ps`)

ps -fea | grep PATTERN | awk {'print $2'} | xargs kill -9
ps -ef | grep [j]ava | awk -F ' ' ' { print $1," ",$2,"\t",$(NF-2),"\t",$(NF-1),"\t",$NF } ' | sort -k4
2012-01-05 16:05:48
User: drockney
Functions: awk grep ps sort
Tags: sort awk grep ps
0

Tested in bash on AIX & Linux, used for WAS versions 6.0 & up. Sorts by node name.

Useful when you have vertically-stacked instances of WAS/Portal. Cuts out all the classpath/optional parameter clutter that makes a simple "ps -ef | grep java" so difficult to sort through.

sudo ps aux --sort:rss | awk '{print $2"\t"$11": "$6/1024" MB"}' | column -t | less
ps -p pid -o logname |tail -1
ps aux | grep PID | grep -v 'grep' | awk '{ print $1 }'
2011-11-05 04:53:29
User: nssy
Functions: awk grep ps
Tags: bash awk grep ps
0

Gets the current system user running a process with the specified pid

ps ewwo command PID | tr ' ' '\n' | grep \=
ps aux | sort -nk 6