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Commands using ps from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using ps - 206 results
docker ps -q | xargs -n 1 docker inspect | jq '.[0].NetworkSettings.Ports +{} | map(select(. != null)[0].HostPort) | map("-L \(.):localhost:\(.)") ' | sed -n 's/.*"\(.*\)".*/\1/p' |xargs boot2docker ssh -N
ps -e -o pid,vsz,comm= | sort -n -k 2
2014-05-14 00:36:50
Functions: ps sort
-1

left-most column is PID, middle is virtual memory being consumed, right-most is actual process.

ps -efa | grep httpd | grep -v grep | awk '{ print $2 }' |xargs
ps -eo pmem,comm | grep application-name
2014-02-23 13:21:29
User: Darkstar
Functions: grep ps
0

Displays memory usage for individual instances of an application that spawns multiple instances of itself. This command also works on single process applications.

ps -eo etime,pid,pcpu,ppid,args | sed -e '/\[.\+\]/d' -e '/^[ \t]*[0-9]\{2\}:[0-9]\{2\} /d' | sort -k1r
2014-02-14 00:22:31
User: neurodrone
Functions: ps sed sort
0

If you have ever been trying to look for a list of processes based on their elapsed time you don't need to look any further.

This command lets you find the list of processes ordered in a reversed order (oldest at the top) that have been running for over an hour on your system. Any system processes are filtered out, leaving only user initiated ones in. I find it extremely useful for debugging and performance analysis.

while ps -p $PID; do sleep 1; done; script2
2014-02-12 08:07:44
User: sanjiv856
Functions: ps sleep
0

Run one script after another in such a way that second script starts after finishing first one. Without using Pipe | or ampercent && i.e. the first process is already running and you want second one to start after the first one finishes. And this can be done in different folder in case the output of second script will affect the output of first script. So run this on any folder you wish to.

Where $PID is the process id of the already running job (add PID number)

script2 is your script you wish to run after first script ends

sleep 1 is sleep for one second (SUFFIX may be ?s? for seconds (the default), ?m? for minutes, ?h? for hours or ?d? for days, read man sleep)

while [ 1 ] ;do ps aux|awk '{if ($8 ~ "D") print }'; sleep 1 ;done
CMD=chrome ; ps h -o pmem -C $CMD | awk '{sum+=$1} END {print sum}'
ps -eo pmem,comm | grep chrome | cut -d " " -f 2 | paste -sd+ | bc
2014-01-03 15:33:16
User: Darkstar
Functions: cut grep paste ps
0

This command will show the sum total of memory used in gigabytes by a program that spawns multiple instances of itself. Replace chrome with whatever program's memory usage you are investigating. This command is rather useless on software that only spawns a single instance of itself.

ps -u marcanuy -o pid,rss,command | awk '{print $0}{sum+=$2} END {print "Total", sum/1024, "MB"}'
2013-11-20 01:21:59
User: marcanuy
Functions: awk ps
0

Add up the amount of memory your processes are using and display the total. Replace marcanuy with your desired username.

ps -p $$
ps r -A
output=$(ps -ef|grep -i java 2>/dev/null); for w in ${output[@]}; do if [[ $w =~ .*Xmx.* ]]; then result=$(grep -oP "[0-9]+" <<< $w); echo $result ;fi ; done| awk 'BEGIN {sum=0} {for(i=1; i<=NF; i++) sum+=$i } END {print sum}'
2013-08-13 14:04:17
User: massiverobot
Functions: awk echo grep ps
Tags: java jvm xmx
0

This will find all the -Xmx[BIGINT] running on a system, add them up for you and give you the total.

svn ps svn:executable yes /web/itscripts/check_mail.plproperty
$ ps -LF -u user
2013-08-06 21:50:48
User: jld
Functions: ps
Tags: bash processes
0

Piping ps into grep is mostly useless: ps has its own filter options like -u and -C

psgrep() { ps aux | tee >(head -1>&2) | grep -v " grep $@" | grep "$@" -i --color=auto; }
2013-08-02 12:44:32
User: fnl
Functions: grep head ps tee
Tags: grep ps
0

Pipes the header row of ps to STDERR, then greps for the command on the output of ps, removing the grep entry before that.

ps -eLF | grep ^user
2013-07-24 09:53:12
User: balsagoth
Functions: grep ps
Tags: bash processes
0

This shows all process (-e) and threads (-L) in full format (-F)

ps aux | grep $(echo $1 | sed "s/^\(.\)/[\1]/g")
2013-07-16 10:10:51
User: opexxx
Functions: echo grep ps sed
Tags: sed grep ps
1

grep по ps aux

ps -eo pid,lstart,cmd
2013-06-17 12:52:53
User: kruspemsv
Functions: ps
Tags: PID
12

That is useful to discover the start time of process older than 1 day.

You can also run:

ls -ld /proc/PID

That's returning the creation date of the proc files from the process. Some users reported that this way might show you a wrong date since any other process like cron, for example, could change this date.

sudo lsof -p `sudo ps aux | grep -i neo4j | grep -v grep | awk '{ print $2 }'`
2013-06-02 10:15:30
User: andycunn
Functions: awk grep ps sudo
0

Inner "ps...grep..." command searches for a process matching the specified .

"lsof -p lists all file descriptors owned by . Includes open files, sockets, devices, etc...

ps aux | sort -n -k2 | awk '{if ($2 < 300) print($0)}'
2013-05-09 13:09:58
User: lili
Functions: awk ps sort
0

Display all pid less the 300 processes info

ps aux | awk '/chrome/ {s+=$6}END{print s/1024}';
ps -A -o rss,command | grep [C]hrome | awk '{sum+=$1} END {printf("%sMB\n",sum/1024)}'
ps -o rss= -C Chrome | (x=0; while read rss; do ((x+=$rss)); done; echo $((x/1024)))
ps -e -m -o user,pid,args,%mem,rss | grep Chrome | perl -ne 'print "$1\n" if / (\d+)$/' | ( x=0;while read line; do (( x += $line )); done; echo $((x/1024)) );