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Commands using tail from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using tail - 224 results
find /var/log -type f -iregex '.*[^\.][^0-9]+$' -not -iregex '.*gz$' 2> /dev/null | xargs tail -n0 -f | ccze -A
2014-07-29 17:11:17
User: rubo77
Functions: find tail xargs
Tags: unix ccze logging
1

This will show all changes in all log files under /var/log/ that are regular files and don't end with `gz` nor with a number

getlunid() { lv=$(df -P $1|grep "^/dev/"|awk '{print $1}'|awk -F/ '{print $3}'); hd=$(lslv -l $lv|tail -1|awk '{print $1}');id=$(odmget -q "name like $hd AND attribute=unique_id" CuAt|grep "value ="|awk -F= '{print $2}'|tr -d '"');echo $id;}
2014-04-20 18:43:21
User: bigstupid
Functions: awk df echo grep tail tr
Tags: aix lvm SAN odm
0

For a given filesystem return the LUN ID. Command assumes 1:1 relationship between fs:lv:hdisk:lun which may not be the case in all environments.

echo $(sudo lshw -businfo | grep -B 1 -m 1 $(df "/path/to/file" | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 6-8) | head -n 1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 5- | tr ":" "-") | sudo tee /sys/bus/usb/drivers/usb/unbind
2014-04-06 12:06:29
User: tweet78
Functions: awk cut df echo grep head sudo tail tee tr
29

You have an external USB drive or key.

Apply this command (using the file path of anything on your device) and it will simulate the unplug of this device.

If you just want the port, just type :

echo $(sudo lshw -businfo | grep -B 1 -m 1 $(df "/path/to/file" | tail -1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 6-8) | head -n 1 | awk '{print $1}' | cut -c 5- | tr ":" "-")

eval $(history | cut -c 8- | grep "adb connect [0-9]" | tail -1)
2014-02-27 14:44:27
User: CanOrhan
Functions: cut eval grep tail
0

Connects to the last adb connection in history.

find . -name "pattern" -type f -exec du -ch {} + | tail -n1
convert image.jpg -resize 1x1 txt: | tail -1 | awk '{gsub(/[,\)]/," "); print $3+$4+$5}'
2013-12-11 09:13:00
User: sucotronic
Functions: awk tail
1

You can get the mean value for the colours in an image. Then you can determine, in general, how dark or bright is the image and run some other actions based on that. I'll recommend to readjust the brightness of the images using +sigmoidal-contrast option of imagemagick convert command.

export KEEP_KERNEL=2; dpkg -l 'linux-image*' | awk '/^ii/ { print $2 }' | grep "[0-9]" | awk 'BEGIN{i=1}{print i++, $0}' | grep `uname -r` -B99 | sort -r | tail -n+$(($KEEP_KERNEL+2)) | awk '{print $2}'| xargs apt-get -y purge
telnet towel.blinkenlights.nl 666 2>/dev/null |tail -2
2013-11-08 01:56:15
User: snaguber
Functions: tail telnet
Tags: telnet BOFH
5

Almost same output with fewer typing... OP had a great idea : BOFH !!!

for ff in directory; do numLines=`wc -l $ff`; numLines=$(echo $numLines | sed 's/ .*//g'); min=$(sort -nrk 1 $ff | tail -1); if [ $numLines -gt 100 ]; then echo $min >> minValues; fi;done;
pbpaste | coffee -bcsp | tail -n +2
2013-09-13 04:50:27
User: roryokane
Functions: tail
-1

This particular combination of flags mimics Try CoffeeScript (on http://coffeescript.org/#try:) as closely as possible. And the `tail` call removes the comment `// Generated by CoffeeScript 1.6.3`.

See `coffee -h` for explanation of `coffee`'s flags.

function garg () { tail -n 1 ${HISTFILE} | awk "{ print \$$1 }" }
2013-09-10 04:07:46
User: plasticphyte
Functions: awk tail
0

This gets the Nth argument in the last line of your history file. This is useful where history is being written after each command, and you want to use arguments from the previous command in the current command, such as when doing copies/moving directories etc.

I wrote this after getting irritated with having to continually type in long paths/arguments.

You could also use $_ if all you want is the last argument.

nslookup www.example.com | tail -2 | head -1 | awk '{print $2}'
2013-09-05 20:26:45
User: wsams
Functions: awk head nslookup tail
1

I'm not sure how reliable this command is, but it works for my needs. Here's also a variant using grep.

nslookup www.example.com | grep "^Address: " | awk '{print $2}'

tail -n 1000 access.log | grep "200 POST" | awk '{print substr($3,0,9)}' | awk '{data[$0]++}END{for(item in data){print item, data[item]}}'
nl FILE_NAME | tail -n 1
2013-07-04 21:54:59
User: P3ter
Functions: nl tail
0

This command print the last line of a file with in first position the total lines number.

find . -type d -print0 | xargs -0 du -s | sort -n | tail -10 | cut -f2 | xargs -I{} du -sh {} | sort -rn
nohup tail /var/log/murmur.log | perl -ne '/^<.>[0-9:. -]{24}(\d+ => )?(.*)/; $pid=`pgrep -u murmur murmurd | head`; chomp $pid; `logger -p info -t "murmurd[$pid]" \\"$2\\"`;' &
2013-05-25 01:12:52
User: MagisterQuis
Functions: info nohup perl tail
0

Sends log lines from murmur's (the mumble server's) logfile to syslog.

tail -F some.log | perl -ne 'print time(), "\n";' | uniq -c
watch 'ls -tr1 | tail -n1 | xargs tail'
2013-05-09 11:37:59
User: batandwa
Functions: tail watch xargs
Tags: tail ls xargs watch
-5

Watches for file modifications in the current directory and tails the file.

history | tail -100 | grep cmd
2013-04-22 03:49:43
User: datamining
Functions: grep tail
0

this also can find the old command you used before

cat .bash_history | tail -100 | grep {command}
2013-04-10 10:40:52
User: techie
Functions: cat grep tail
-9

I know how hard it is to find an old command running through all the files because you couldn't remember for your life what it was. Heres the solution!! Grep the history for it. depending on how old the command you can head or tail or if you wanted to search all because you cannot think how long ago it was then miss out the middle part of the command. This is a very easy and effective way to find that command you are looking for.

ls -Sh **/*(.Lm+100) | tail -5
2013-03-21 20:22:11
User: khayyam
Functions: ls tail
Tags: tail ls zsh
1

zsh: list of files sorted by size, greater than 100mb, head the top 5. '**/*' is recursive, and the glob qualifiers provide '.' = regular file, 'L' size, which is followed by 'm' = 'megabyte', and finally '+100' = a value of 100

ls -lT -rt | grep "^-" | awk 'BEGIN {START=2002} (START <= $9){ print $10 ;START=$9 }' | tail -1
2013-02-24 23:39:22
User: Glamdring
Functions: awk grep ls tail
Tags: ls date osx
0

On the Mac, the 'ls' function can sort based on month/day/time, but seems to lack ability to filter on the Year field (#9 among the long listed fields). The sorted list continuously increases the 'START' year for the most recently accessed set of files. The final month printed will be the highest month that appeared in that START year. The command does its magic on the current directory, and suitably discards all entries that are themselves directories. If you expect files dating prior to 2002, change the START year accordingly.

(echo -e "HTTP/1.1 200 Ok\n\r"; tail -f /var/log/syslog) | nc -l 1234
2013-02-09 06:15:42
User: adimania
Functions: echo tail
4

This one is tried and tested for Ubuntu 12.04. Works great for tailing any file over http.

while true; do (date | tr "\n" ";") && ping -q -c 1 www.google.com|tail -1|cut -d/ -f5 ;sleep 1; done >> uptime.csv
2013-02-06 22:06:09
User: fanchok
Functions: cut date ping sleep tail tr
0

Used in OS X.

tr "\n" ";"

may be replaced by

echo ";"

with linux versions of date.

I reused

ping -q -c 1 www.google.com|tail -1|cut -d/ -f5

largest() { dir=${1:-"./"}; count=${2:-"10"}; echo "Getting top $count largest files in $dir"; du -sx "$dir/"* | sort -nk 1 | tail -n $count | cut -f2 | xargs -I file du -shx file; }
2013-01-21 09:45:21
User: jhyland87
Functions: cut du echo file sort tail xargs
1

You can simply run "largest", and list the top 10 files/directories in ./, or you can pass two parameters, the first being the directory, the 2nd being the limit of files to display.

Best off putting this in your bashrc or bash_profile file