Hide

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.


Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

UpGuard checks and validates configurations for every major OS, network device, and cloud provider.
Hide

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:

Hide

News

May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!
Hide

Top Tags

Hide

Functions

Commands tagged logs from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged logs - 8 results
sed -i 's/^.*?].*?:\s//g' skype-chat-log.txt
2014-05-26 07:48:36
Functions: sed
0

Regular expression search pattern to remove the Datetime and Name when you paste from skype chat into your text editor

From this Gist:

https://gist.github.com/webstandardcss/3967760857d6be470dda

zcat -f $(ls -tr access.log*)
2010-10-30 22:54:54
User: dooblem
Functions: ls zcat
Tags: logs zcat
2

with zcat force option it's even simpler.

goaccess -f /var/log/apache2/access.log -s -b
2010-10-25 20:03:18
User: allinurl
1

GoAccess is an open source real-time Apache web log analyzer and interactive viewer that runs in a terminal in *nix systems. It provides fast and valuable HTTP statistics for system administrators that require a visual server report on the fly. http://goaccess.prosoftcorp.com/

*/5 * * * * root /usr/local/nagios/sbin/nsca_check_disk 2>&1 |/usr/bin/logger -t nsca_check_disk
2010-07-02 00:47:05
6

This command will log the output of your simple cronjobs to syslog, and syslog will take it from there. Works great for monitoring scripts which only produce simple output.

Advantages:

* This can be used by regular users, without modifying system files like /etc/syslog.conf

* Reduce cron spam to [email protected] (Please stop spaming the sysadmins)

* Uses common tools like syslog (and logrotate) so that you don't need to maintain yet another krufty logfile.

* Still ensures that the output is logged somewhere, for posterity. Perhaps it's stored the secure, central syslog server, for example.

* Seems to work fine on Ubuntu, CentOS, FreeBSD & MacOSX

zgrep -h "" `ls -tr access.log*`
2010-06-19 09:44:05
User: dooblem
Functions: zgrep
2

I use zgrep because it also parses non gzip files.

With ls -tr, we parse logs in time order.

Greping the empty string just concatenates all logs, but you can also grep an IP, an URL...

grep -Ri searchterm ~/.purple/logs/* | sed -e 's/<.*?>//g'
2009-12-07 19:38:18
User: Nostoc
Functions: grep sed
Tags: pidgin logs
2

will search trought pidgin conversation logs for "searchterm", and output them stripping the html tags. The "sed" command is optionnal if your logs are stored in plain text format.

ls -t1 | head -n1 | xargs tail -f
tail -F file
2009-07-23 07:37:11
User: recursiverse
Functions: tail
Tags: tail logs
15

If you use 'tail -f foo.txt' and it becomes temporarily moved/deleted (ie: log rolls over) then tail will not pick up on the new foo.txt and simply waits with no output.

'tail -F' allows you to follow the file by it's name, rather than a descriptor. If foo.txt disappears, tail will wait until the filename appears again and then continues tailing.