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Wow, didn't really expect you to read this far down. The latest iteration of the site is in open beta. It's a gentle open beta-- not in prime-time just yet. It's being hosted over at UpGuard (link) and you are more than welcome to give it a shot. Couple things:

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Commands tagged logging from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged logging - 13 results
sajb {$ip="192.168.100.1";$old=0;while(1){$up=test-connection -quiet -count 1 $ip;if($up-ne$old){$s=(date -u %s).split('.')[0]+' '+(date -f s).replace('T',' ')+' '+$ip+' '+$(if($up){'Up'}else{'Down'});echo $s|out-file -a $home\ping.txt;$old=$up}sleep 10}}
0

IMPORTANT: You need Windows PowerShell to run this command - in your Windows Command Prompt, type

powershell

Uses sajb to start a PowerShell background job that pings an IP host every 10 seconds.

Any changes in the host's Up/Down state is time-stamped and logged to a file.

Date/time stamps are logged in two formats: Unix and human-readable.

A while(1) loop repeats the test every 10 seconds by using the sleep command.

See the Sample Output for more detail.

I use this command to log Up/Down events of my Motorola SB6141 cable modem (192.168.100.1).

To end the logging, close the PowerShell window or use the "exit" command.

ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script -f \"$L\"";}
2015-10-14 13:14:29
User: flatcap
Functions: ssh
3

A wrapper around ssh to automatically provide logging and session handling.

This function runs ssh, which runs screen, which runs script.

.

The logs and the screen session are stored on the server.

This means you can leave a session running and re-attach to it later, or from another machine.

.

.

Requirements:

* Log sessions on a remote server

* Transparent - nothing extra to type

* No installation - nothing to copy to the server beforehand

.

Features:

* Function wrapper delegating to ssh

- so nothing to remember

- uses .ssh/config as expected

- passes your command line option to ssh

* Self-contained: no scripts to install on the server

* Uses screen(1), so is:

- detachable

- re-attachable

- shareable

* Records session using script(1)

* Configurable log file location, which may contain variables or whitespace

L="$HOME" # local variable

L="\$HOME" # server variable

L="some space"

.

Limitations:

* Log dir/file may not contain '~' (which would require eval on the server)

.

.

The sessions are named by the local user connecting to the server.

Therefore if you detach and re-run the same command you will reconnect to your original session.

If you want to connect/share another's session simply run:

USER=bob ssh [email protected]

.

The command above is stripped down to an absolute minimum.

A fully expanded and annotated version is available as a Gist (git pastebin):

https://gist.github.com/flatcap/3c42326abeb1197ee714

.

If you want to add timing info to script, change the command to:

ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script --timing=\"$L-timing\" -f \"$L\"";}
find /var/log -type f -iregex '.*[^\.][^0-9]+$' -not -iregex '.*gz$' 2> /dev/null | xargs tail -n0 -f | ccze -A
2014-07-29 17:11:17
User: rubo77
Functions: find tail xargs
Tags: unix ccze logging
4

This will show all changes in all log files under /var/log/ that are regular files and don't end with `gz` nor with a number

watch -n 4 "tail -n $(expr $(tput lines) - 4) /var/log/apache2/access.log | cut -c 1-$(tput cols)"
2013-12-03 23:45:25
User: atw527
Functions: watch
0

This bash one-liner will let you watch the tail end of a log file in real time.

logger -t MyProgramName "Whatever you're logging"
logme(){ echo "$(date +%d-%m-%Y-%H:%M) => $0 @ $1 returned error" >> persoscript.log }
2013-10-22 15:55:01
User: qcjn
Functions: echo
Tags: logging
0

Put this logging function in you're script, when need it call it.

command || logme "Error with command"

pygmentize -l pytb myapp.log | less -SR
while sleep 1; do date; (netstat -a -n | grep 80) ; done
sed -n '/05\/Dec\/2010/,$ p' access.log | goaccess -s -b
2010-12-13 17:37:33
User: allinurl
Functions: sed
0

GoAccess is an open source real-time Apache web log analyzer and interactive viewer that runs in a terminal in *nix systems. It provides fast and valuable HTTP statistics for system administrators that require a visual server report on the fly. http://goaccess.prosoftcorp.com/

tail -f file |xargs -IX printf "$(date -u)\t%s\n" X
alias sshv='ssh -vvv -o LogLevel=DEBUG3'
2010-10-30 11:23:52
User: AskApache
Functions: alias
3

When debugging an ssh connection either to optimize your settings ie compression, ciphers, or more commonly for debugging an issue connecting, this alias comes in real handy as it's not easy to remember the '-o LogLevel=DEBUG3' argument, which adds a boost of debugging info not available with -vvv alone.

Especially useful are the FD info, and the setup negotiation to create a cleaner, faster connection.

sudo ls -l $(eval echo "/proc/{$(echo $(pgrep java)|sed 's/ /,/')}/fd/")|grep log|sed 's/[^/]* //g'|xargs -r tail -f
2010-07-30 18:20:00
User: vutcovici
Functions: echo eval grep ls sed sudo tail xargs
-1

Tail all logs that are opened by all java processes. This is helpful when you are on a new environment and you do not know where the logs are located. Instead of java you can put any process name. This command does work only for Linux.

The list of all log files opened by java process:

sudo ls -l $(eval echo "/proc/{$(echo $(pgrep java)|sed 's/ /,/')}/fd/")|grep log|sed 's/[^/]* //g'
*/5 * * * * root /usr/local/nagios/sbin/nsca_check_disk 2>&1 |/usr/bin/logger -t nsca_check_disk
2010-07-02 00:47:05
6

This command will log the output of your simple cronjobs to syslog, and syslog will take it from there. Works great for monitoring scripts which only produce simple output.

Advantages:

* This can be used by regular users, without modifying system files like /etc/syslog.conf

* Reduce cron spam to [email protected] (Please stop spaming the sysadmins)

* Uses common tools like syslog (and logrotate) so that you don't need to maintain yet another krufty logfile.

* Still ensures that the output is logged somewhere, for posterity. Perhaps it's stored the secure, central syslog server, for example.

* Seems to work fine on Ubuntu, CentOS, FreeBSD & MacOSX