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Commands tagged mkdir from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged mkdir - 15 results
ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script -f \"$L\"";}
2015-10-14 13:14:29
User: flatcap
Functions: ssh

A wrapper around ssh to automatically provide logging and session handling.

This function runs ssh, which runs screen, which runs script.


The logs and the screen session are stored on the server.

This means you can leave a session running and re-attach to it later, or from another machine.




* Log sessions on a remote server

* Transparent - nothing extra to type

* No installation - nothing to copy to the server beforehand



* Function wrapper delegating to ssh

- so nothing to remember

- uses .ssh/config as expected

- passes your command line option to ssh

* Self-contained: no scripts to install on the server

* Uses screen(1), so is:

- detachable

- re-attachable

- shareable

* Records session using script(1)

* Configurable log file location, which may contain variables or whitespace

L="$HOME" # local variable

L="\$HOME" # server variable

L="some space"



* Log dir/file may not contain '~' (which would require eval on the server)



The sessions are named by the local user connecting to the server.

Therefore if you detach and re-run the same command you will reconnect to your original session.

If you want to connect/share another's session simply run:

USER=bob ssh root@server


The command above is stripped down to an absolute minimum.

A fully expanded and annotated version is available as a Gist (git pastebin):



If you want to add timing info to script, change the command to:

ssh(){ L="\$HOME/logs/$(date +%F_%H:%M)-$USER";/usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" "mkdir -p \"${L%/*}\";screen -xRRS $USER script --timing=\"$L-timing\" -f \"$L\"";}
function mkdcd () { mkdir "$1" && cd "$1" }
rmdir -p new/directory/path
2013-05-21 12:34:55
User: r3tro
Functions: rmdir
Tags: mkdir rmdir

Removes all directories on given path, working from right to left, and stops when reaching a non-empty directory

Counterpart of

mkdir -p new/directory/path

Shortcut (must be issues as next command immediately after mkdir):


( see http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/19/runs-previous-command-but-replacing )

mkdir -p /path/to/folder.d; \cd $_
alias md='mkdir -p'; alias rd='rmdir'; mcd () { mkdir "$@" && cd "$_"; }
2012-08-12 12:54:51
User: expelledboy
Functions: alias cd mcd mkdir

I realise that this is just a reiteration of another entry (regardless of whether I came up with all this all by myself), but I would like present my additional alias' in context as a method of managing your directories. Rather convenient.

function mkdircd () { mkdir -p "$@" && eval cd "\"\$$#\""; }
2012-06-26 17:19:16
User: ankush108
Functions: cd eval mkdir
Tags: cd mkdir

Creates a directory and then cds into it directly

for i in `seq 100`; do mkdir f${i}; touch ./f${i}/myfile$i ;done
2011-09-29 01:03:46
Functions: mkdir touch
Tags: seq mkdir touch

creates 100 directories f(1-100) with a file in each matched to the directory (/f1/myfile1, .. /f98/myfile98,/f99/myfile99/,/f100/myfile100,etc )

mkdir /home/foo/doc/bar && cd $_
2011-08-12 11:29:19
User: kzh
Functions: cd mkdir

The biggest advantage of this over the functions is that it is portable.

take() { mkdir -p $1 && cd $1; }
2011-04-06 15:22:13
Functions: cd mkdir
Tags: cd mkdir

This creates a bash function `take` that you can call with the name of the directory as the first parameter. Add the function to ~/.bashrc to have it available anytime.

mydir(){mkdir -p $1 && cd $1}
2011-04-06 15:03:33
User: m0jumb0
Functions: cd
Tags: cd mkdir

Make it a reusable function and add the -p flag to mkdir to create directories recursively

usage: mydir some/dir/to/create

Dir=dirname; mkdir $Dir && cd $Dir
2011-04-06 14:53:57
User: saibbot
Functions: cd mkdir
Tags: cd mkdir

Create a directory called "dirname" and navigate into it.

files -type f | xargs -n100 | while read l; do mkdir $((++f)); cp $l $f; done
2011-02-15 23:15:16
User: flatcap
Functions: cp mkdir read xargs

Take a folder full of files and split it into smaller folders containing a maximum number of files. In this case, 100 files per directory.

find creates the list of files

xargs breaks up the list into groups of 100

for each group, create a directory and copy in the files

Note: This command won't work if there is whitespace in the filenames (but then again, neither do the alternative commands :-)

echo 'mkcd() { mkdir -p "$@" && cd "$_"; }' >> ~/.bashrc
2010-01-13 09:37:56
User: phaidros
Functions: cd echo mkdir

combines mkdir and cd

added quotes around $_, thanx to flatcap!

md () { mkdir -p "$@" && cd "$@"; }
2009-09-24 16:09:19
User: drewk
Functions: cd mkdir

How often do you make a directory (or series of directories) and then change into it to do whatever? 99% of the time that is what I do.

This BASH function 'md' will make the directory path then immediately change to the new directory. By using the 'mkdir -p' switch, the intermediate directories are created as well if they do not exist.

mkdir $(date +%Y%m%d)
2009-04-25 14:16:45
User: thebodzio
Functions: date mkdir
Tags: alias date mkdir

Not a discovery but a useful one nontheless.

In the above example date format is 'yyyymmdd'. For other possible formats see 'man date'.

This command can be also very convenient when aliased to some meaningful name:

alias mkdd='mkdir $(date +%Y%m%d)'