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Commands using mkdir from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using mkdir - 80 results
[ ! -d /squashed/usr ] && mkdir -p /squashed/usr/{ro,rw} ; mksquashfs /usr /squashed/usr/usr.sfs.new -b 65536 ; mv /squashed/usr/usr.sfs.new /squashed/usr/usr.sfs ; reboot
2014-05-10 06:01:06
User: mhs
Functions: mkdir mv
4

Periodically run the one-liner above if/when there are significant changes to the files in /usr/

= Before rebooting, add following to /etc/fstab : =

/squashed/usr/usr.sfs /squashed/usr/ro squashfs loop,ro 0 0 usr /usr aufs udba=reval,br:/squashed/usr/rw:/squashed/usr/ro 0 0

No need to delete original /usr/ ! (unless you don't care about recovery). Also AuFS does not work with XFS

(mountpoint -q "/media/mpdr1" && df /media/mpdr1/* > /dev/null 2>&1) || ((sudo umount "/media/mpdr1" > /dev/null 2>&1 || true) && (sudo mkdir "/media/mpdr1" > /dev/null 2>&1 || true) && sudo mount "/dev/sdd1" "/media/mpdr1")
2014-04-12 11:23:21
User: tweet78
Functions: df mkdir mount sudo umount
20

In my example, the mount point is /media/mpdr1 and the FS is /dev/sdd1

/mountpoint-path = /media/mpdr1

filesystem=/dev/sdd1

Why this command ?

Well, in fact, with some external devices I used to face some issues : during data transfer from the device to the internal drive, some errors occurred and the device was unmounted and remounted again in a different folder.

In such situations, the command mountpoint gave a positive result even if the FS wasn't properly mounted, that's why I added the df part.

And if the device is not properly mounted, the command tries to unmount, to create the folder (if it exists already it will also work) and finally mount the FS on the given mount point.

mkdir Epub ; mv -v --target-directory=Epub $(fgrep -lr epub *)
IFS=$(echo -en "\n\b"); mkdir Epub; for i in `find . | grep epub`; do echo "epub: $i"; mv -v "$i" Epub; done
function mkdcd () { mkdir "$1" && cd "$1" }
IFS=$(echo -en "\n\b"); input="/my/input/dir/*.flac"; mkdir -p $(dirname $f)/mp3; for f in $input; do ffmpeg -i $f -ab 196k -ac 2 -ar 48000 $(dirname $f)/mp3/$(basename "${f:0:${#f}-4}mp3"); done
ssh user@remotehost "find basedir -type d" | xargs -I {} -t mkdir -p {}
2013-07-17 07:14:32
User: neomefistox
Functions: mkdir ssh xargs
0

The directories are created in the local host with the same structure below of a remote base directory, including the 'basedir' in case that it does not exists.

You must replace user and remotehost (or IP address) with your proper values

ssh will ask for the password of the user in remotehost, unless you had included properly your hostname in the remote .ssh/known_hosts file.

mkdir -p temp && for f in *.pdf ; do qpdf --password=YOURPASSWORDHERE --decrypt "$f" "temp/$f"; done && mv temp/* . && rm -rf temp
2013-06-25 18:41:51
Functions: mkdir mv rm
-1

Replace YOURPASSWORDHERE with the pdf password. [qpdf needed]

git-createrepo() { repos_path='/srv/git/'; mkdir $repos_path$1; cd $repos_path$1; git init --bare; echo "Repository location: ssh://$USER@`cat /etc/HOSTNAME``pwd`"; cd -; }
2013-05-09 21:44:24
User: batandwa
Functions: cd echo init mkdir
Tags: git
-3

Creates a git repository in a predefined location.

mkdir -p /path/to/folder.d; \cd $_
mkdir r1 && sshfs remote1:/home/user r1 && rsync r1/stuff remote2:~/backups/
2013-01-11 14:12:22
User: unhammer
Functions: mkdir rsync
Tags: rsync sshfs
-1

rsync by itself doesn't support copying between two remote hosts, but if you use sshfs you can pretend one of them is local. If you have a passphrase-less ssh-key, you can even put this script into a cron job.

A faster alternative is to run ssh-keygen on remote1 and put the pubkey into remote2:~/.ssh/authorized_keys, running rsync on remote1 (or vice versa), but the problem with that is that now a hacker on remote1 can access remote2 at any time. The above method ensures your local computer stays the weak link.

alias md='mkdir -p'; alias rd='rmdir'; mcd () { mkdir "$@" && cd "$_"; }
2012-08-12 12:54:51
User: expelledboy
Functions: alias cd mcd mkdir
0

I realise that this is just a reiteration of another entry (regardless of whether I came up with all this all by myself), but I would like present my additional alias' in context as a method of managing your directories. Rather convenient.

function mkdircd () { mkdir -p "$@" && eval cd "\"\$$#\""; }
2012-06-26 17:19:16
User: ankush108
Functions: cd eval mkdir
Tags: cd mkdir
0

Creates a directory and then cds into it directly

cp -r path/to/file/tree $(mkdir -p new/path/here; echo new/path/here)
2012-04-27 16:18:11
User: wirespeed
Functions: cp echo mkdir
0

You need to cp, mv, scp, ..., some files around from one place to another, and after having laboriously typed out the source path, you remember that the destination directory doesn't yet exist, and so the command will fail. So rather than killing the command line and starting over, just interpolate the results of creating the directory and echo its name. You could DRY this with a for; do; done, but that may be more trouble than it's worth.

tag() { local t="$HOME/tags/$1"; [ -d $t ] || mkdir -p $t; shift; local i; for i in $*; do ln -s $(readlink -f $i) $t;done}
2012-02-10 15:43:02
Functions: ln mkdir readlink
0

shell function which allows you to tag files by creating symbolic links directories in a 'tags' folder.

The tag function takes a tag name as its first argument, then a list of files which take that tag. The directory $HOME/tags/tagname will then hold symbolic links to each of the tagged files. This function was modified from bartonski's (http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/10216) inspired by tmsu (found at https://bitbucket.org/oniony/tmsu/wiki/Home) with readlink function by flxndn (http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/10222).

Example:

tag dog airedale.txt .shizturc weimeraner.pl

This will create $HOME/tags/dog which contains symbolic links to airedale.txt .shizturc and weimeraner.pl

tag() { local t="$HOME/tags/$1"; [ -d $t ] || mkdir -p $t; shift; ln $* $t;}
2012-02-08 12:40:45
User: bartonski
Functions: ln mkdir
2

The tag function takes a tag name as its first argument, then a list of files which take that tag. The directory $HOME/tags/tagname will then hold symbolic links to each of the tagged files. This function was inspired by tmsu (found at https://bitbucket.org/oniony/tmsu/wiki/Home).

Example:

tag dog airedale.txt .shizturc weimeraner.pl

This will create $HOME/tags/dog which contains symbolic links to airedale.txt .shizturc and weimeraner.pl

mkdir rotated; for v in *.3gp; do ffmpeg -i $v -vf transpose=2 -vcodec ffv1 rotated/${v/3gp/avi} ; done
2012-02-04 18:20:04
User: keturn
Functions: mkdir
5

Takes all the .3gp files in the directory, rotates them by 90 degrees, and saves them in the lossless ffv1 encoding.

If this rotates in the wrong direction, you may want transponse=1

Re-encoding to ffv1 may result in a significant increase in file size, as it is a lossless format. Other applications may not recognize ffv1 if they don't use ffmpeg code. "huffyuv" might be another option for lossless saving of your transformations.

The audio may be re-encoded as well, if the encoding used by your 3gp file doesn't work in a avi container.

for i in `seq 100`; do mkdir f${i}; touch ./f${i}/myfile$i ;done
2011-09-29 01:03:46
Functions: mkdir touch
Tags: seq mkdir touch
0

creates 100 directories f(1-100) with a file in each matched to the directory (/f1/myfile1, .. /f98/myfile98,/f99/myfile99/,/f100/myfile100,etc )

mkdir replaced;for i in *; do cat "$i"| sed 's/foo/bar/' > "replaced/$i"; done
2011-08-30 08:28:26
User: rubo77
Functions: cat mkdir sed
-5

if you want to replace "foo" with "bar" in all files in a folder, and put the resulting files into a new subfolder

mkdir /home/foo/doc/bar && cd $_
2011-08-12 11:29:19
User: kzh
Functions: cd mkdir
43

The biggest advantage of this over the functions is that it is portable.

mkdir ${1..10}
find . -type d -exec mkdir /new/path/{} \;
2011-07-18 05:17:39
User: paulochf
Functions: find mkdir
-1

It's not better than the former, just another possible way.

Found at http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/copy-directory-structure-only-208796/

Credits to whansard

The command finds all .mp3 files in all subfolders from where it's ran, catches its "relative path" and creates inside /new/path/ with the same "relative path".

PS: /new/path/ must exists

Use case: folder with flac files with tree structure ../artist/album/number-title.flac

1) convert flac->mp3 in the same folder: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/6341/convert-all-.flac-from-a-folder-subtree-in-192kb-mp3

2) search for mp3 files and recreate tree structure to another path: this command

3) move all mp3 files to that new folder: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/8854/move-mp3-files-to-another-path-with-existing-subtree-structure

$ mkdir -p /tmp/dir1/{0..20}
2011-07-07 19:27:40
User: adagio
Functions: mkdir
0

if dir1 does not exists

mkdir /tmp/dir1/{0..20}
parallel -a <(seq 0 20) mkdir /tmp/dir1/{}