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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
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Commands using wc from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using wc - 154 results
netstat -anp | grep :80 | grep ESTABLISHED | wc -l
2015-04-10 19:32:31
User: krizzo
Functions: grep netstat wc
Tags: session

This counts all established sessions on port 80. You can change :80 to any port number you want to check.

find . -name '*.php' | xargs wc -l
2014-12-24 11:15:18
User: erez83
Functions: find wc xargs
Tags: count code

count all the lines of code in specific directory recursively

in this case only *.php

can be *.*

watch -n0.5 'ps -e -o pid,vsz,comm= | sort -n -k 2 | grep apache | wc -l'
num_errs=`grep ERROR /var/log/syslog | tee >(cat >&2) | wc -l`
2014-03-12 00:04:24
Functions: cat tee wc

Many circumstances call for creating variable of a summary result while still printing the original pipe. Inserting "tee >(cat >&2)" allows the command output to still be printed while permitting the same output to be processed into a variable.

find . -type d| while read i; do echo $(ls -1 "$i"|wc -m) $(du -s "$i"); done|sort -s -n -k1,1 -k2,2 |awk -F'[ \t]+' '{ idx=$1$2; if (array[idx] == 1) {print} else if (array[idx]) {print array[idx]; print; array[idx]=1} else {array[idx]=$0}}'
2014-02-25 22:50:09
User: knoppix5
Functions: awk du echo find ls read sort wc

Very quick! Based only on the content sizes and the character counts of filenames. If both numbers are equal then two (or more) directories seem to be most likely identical.

if in doubt apply:

diff -rq path_to_dir1 path_to_dir2

AWK function taken from here:


unzip -p doc.odt content.xml | sed 's|<[^>]*>| |g' | wc -l
for i in */; do echo $(find $i -type f -regextype posix-extended -regex ".*\.(mp3|ogg|wav|flac)" | wc -l) $i ; done
find . -type d -maxdepth 1 -print0 | xargs -0 -I{} sh -c 'find "{}" -type f | grep "ogg\|mp3\|wav\|flac$" | wc -l | tr -d "\n"; echo " {}"'
2013-12-22 13:40:29
User: dbrgn
Functions: echo find grep sh tr wc xargs

This lists the number of ogg/mp3/wav/flac files in each subdirectory of the current directory. The output can be sorted by piping it into "sort -n".

wc -l *c
for i in `find -L /var/ -wholename \*log\* -type d`; do COUNT=`ls -1U $i | wc -l`; if [ $COUNT -gt 10 ]; then echo $i $COUNT; fi; done
for i in {1..31}; do ls -1 *${YYYY}${MM}`printf "%02d" $i`* | wc -l; done
2013-07-26 07:08:04
User: Paulus
Functions: ls wc
Tags: bash Linux

RU: Найдет число файлов в папке по данной маске в цикле по дням месяца

while true; do netstat -a|grep WAIT|wc -l; sleep 5; done
2013-06-19 09:19:41
User: adimania
Functions: grep netstat sleep wc
Tags: netstat tcp

This has saved me many times while debugging timeout issues to "too many open files" issues. A high number of the order of thousand, indicates that somewhere connection is not being closed properly.

find /usr/include/ -name '*.[c|h]pp' -o -name '*.[ch]' -print0 | xargs -0 cat | grep -v "^ *$" | grep -v "^ *//" | grep -v "^ */\*.*\*/" | wc -l
2013-06-17 08:37:37
Functions: cat find grep wc xargs

Count your source and header file's line numbers. This ignores blank lines, C++ style comments, single line C style comments.

This will not ignore blank lines with tabs or multiline C style comments.

echo -n "foo" | wc -c
ls -R | wc -l
pdftotext file.pdf - | wc -w
2013-06-01 16:29:04
Functions: wc

Bases word count on the genreated PDF file; so make sure to update this first. The PDF file also includes references and output of any macros.

more restart_weblogic.log | grep "LISTEN" | awk '{ print $7 }' | uniq | wc -l
for ii in $(find /path/to/docroot -type f -name \*.php); do echo $ii; wc -lc $ii | awk '{ nr=$2/($1 + 1); printf("%d\n",nr); }'; done
2013-04-05 19:06:17
Functions: awk echo find wc

I have found that base64 encoded webshells and the like contain lots of data but hardly any newlines due to the formatting of their payloads. Checking the "width" will not catch everything, but then again, this is a fuzzy problem that relies on broad generalizations and heuristics that are never going to be perfect.

What I have done is set an arbitrary threshold (200 for example) and compare the values that are produced by this script, only displaying those above the threshold. One webshell I tested this on scored 5000+ so I know it works for at least one piece of malware.

ps aux | grep [process] | awk '{print $2}' | xargs -I % ls /proc/%/fd | wc -l
sed ?s/[sub_str]/[sub_str]\n/g? [text_file] | wc -l
grep -Fvxf $(file1) $(file2) | wc -l
read -p 'Script: ' S && C=$S.crypt H='eval "$((dd if=$0 bs=1 skip=//|gpg -d)2>/dev/null)"; exit;' && gpg -c<$S|cat >$C <(echo $H|sed s://:$(echo "$H"|wc -c):) - <(chmod +x $C)
2013-03-10 08:59:45
User: rodolfoap
Functions: cat chmod echo gpg read sed wc

(Please see sample output for usage)

Use any script name (the read command gets it) and it will be encrypted with the extension .crypt, i.e.:

myscript --> myscript.crypt

You can execute myscript.crypt only if you know the password. If you die, your script dies with you.

If you modify the startup line, be careful with the offset calculation of the crypted block (the XX string).

Not difficult to make script editable (an offset-dd piped to a gpg -d piped to a vim - piped to a gpg -c directed to script.new ), but not enough space to do it on a one liner.

Sorry for the chmod on parentheses, I dont like "-" at the end.

Thanks flatcap for the subshell abbreviation to /dev/null

ps -u user_name_here | grep process_name_here | wc -l
find . -type f -name "*.txt" | while read; do (($(cat $THISFILE | wc -l) < 10)) && rm -vf "$THISFILE"; done