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Commands tagged crypt from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged crypt - 5 results
read -p 'Script: ' S && C=$S.crypt H='eval "$((dd if=$0 bs=1 skip=//|gpg -d)2>/dev/null)"; exit;' && gpg -c<$S|cat >$C <(echo $H|sed s://:$(echo "$H"|wc -c):) - <(chmod +x $C)
2013-03-10 08:59:45
User: rodolfoap
Functions: cat chmod echo gpg read sed wc
7

(Please see sample output for usage)

Use any script name (the read command gets it) and it will be encrypted with the extension .crypt, i.e.:

myscript --> myscript.crypt

You can execute myscript.crypt only if you know the password. If you die, your script dies with you.

If you modify the startup line, be careful with the offset calculation of the crypted block (the XX string).

Not difficult to make script editable (an offset-dd piped to a gpg -d piped to a vim - piped to a gpg -c directed to script.new ), but not enough space to do it on a one liner.

Sorry for the chmod on parentheses, I dont like "-" at the end.

Thanks flatcap for the subshell abbreviation to /dev/null

echo "eval \"\$(dd if=\$0 bs=1 skip=XX 2>/dev/null|gpg -d 2>/dev/null)\"; exit" > script.secure; sed -i s:XX:$(stat -c%s script.secure): script.secure; gpg -c < script.bash >> script.secure; chmod +x script.secure
2013-03-09 11:16:48
User: rodolfoap
Functions: chmod echo gpg sed stat
6

(Please see sample output for usage)

script.bash is your script, which will be crypted to script.secure

script.bash --> script.secure

You can execute script.secure only if you know the password. If you die, your script dies with you.

If you modify the startup line, be careful with the offset calculation of the crypted block (the XX string).

Not difficult to make script editable (an offset-dd piped to a gpg -d piped to a vim - piped to a gpg -c directed to script.new ), but not enough space to do it on a one liner.

cryptmount -m <name>
2012-01-17 18:02:47
User: totti
-2

In order to create a new encrypted filing system managed by cryptmount,

you can use the supplied 'cryptmount-setup' program, which can be used

by the superuser to interactively configure a basic setup.

Alternatively, suppose that we wish to setup a new encrypted filing

system, that will have a target-name of "opaque". If we have a free

disk partition available, say /dev/hdb63, then we can use this directly

to store the encrypted filing system. Alternatively, if we want to

store the encrypted filing system within an ordinary file, we need to

create space using a recipe such as:

dd if=/dev/zero of=/home/opaque.fs bs=1M count=512

.

cryptmount --generate-key 32 opaque

.

cryptmount --prepare opaque

.

mke2fs /dev/mapper/opaque

.

cryptmount --release opaque

.

mkdir /home/crypt

.

cryptmount -m opaque

.

cryptmount -u opaque

For detail see sample output

openssl s_client -connect localhost:443 -ssl2
useradd -m -p $(perl -e'print crypt("pass", "mb")') user
2010-09-03 19:00:56
User: mariusbutuc
Functions: perl useradd
0

Function: char * crypt (const char *key, const char *salt)

The crypt function takes a password, key, as a string, and a salt character array which is described below, and returns a printable ASCII string which starts with another salt. It is believed that, given the output of the function, the best way to find a key that will produce that output is to guess values of key until the original value of key is found.

The salt parameter does two things. Firstly, it selects which algorithm is used, the MD5-based one or the DES-based one. Secondly, it makes life harder for someone trying to guess passwords against a file containing many passwords; without a salt, an intruder can make a guess, run crypt on it once, and compare the result with all the passwords. With a salt, the intruder must run crypt once for each different salt.

For the MD5-based algorithm, the salt should consist of the string $1$, followed by up to 8 characters, terminated by either another $ or the end of the string. The result of crypt will be the salt, followed by a $ if the salt didn't end with one, followed by 22 characters from the alphabet ./0-9A-Za-z, up to 34 characters total. Every character in the key is significant.

For the DES-based algorithm, the salt should consist of two characters from the alphabet ./0-9A-Za-z, and the result of crypt will be those two characters followed by 11 more from the same alphabet, 13 in total. Only the first 8 characters in the key are significant.