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Commands using chmod from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using chmod - 80 results
for i in chmod chown; do sudo "$i" --reference=/home/user/copyfromfile /tmp/targetfile; done
2014-08-28 15:08:32
User: zlemini
Functions: chmod sudo
1

Copy both perms and owner group from one file to another.

inotifywait -mr -e CREATE $HOME/bin/ | while read i; do chmod +x $(echo "$i" | sed 's/ \S* //'); done
find . -exec chmod o+rx {}\;
sudo chmod --reference=Referenz.foo Datei.foo
for i in * ; do chmod -R 777 $i;done
echo '#! /usr/bin/ksh\ncat $2 | openssl dgst -sha256 | read hashish; if [[ $hashish = $1 ]]; then echo $2: OK; else echo $2: FAILED; fi;' > shacheck; chmod +x shacheck; cat hashishes.sha256 | xargs -n 2 ./shacheck;
2013-09-18 21:51:20
User: RAKK
Functions: cat chmod echo read xargs
0

This command is used to verify a sha256sum-formatted file hash list on IBM AIX or any other UNIX-like OS that has openssl but doesn't have sha256sum by default. Steps:

1: Save to the filesystem a script that:

A: Receives as arguments the two parts of one line of a sha256sum listing

B: Feeds a file into openssl on SHA256 standard input hash calculation mode, and saves the result

C: Compares the calculated hash against the one received as argument

D: Outputs the result in a sha256sum-like format

2: Make the script runnable

3: Feed the sha256sum listing to xargs, running the aforementioned script and passing 2 arguments at a time

echo '#! /usr/bin/ksh\necho `cat $1 | openssl dgst -sha256` $1' > sslsha256; chmod +x sslsha256; find directory -type f -exec ./sslsha256 \{\} \;
2013-09-18 17:37:50
User: RAKK
Functions: chmod echo find
0

This command is for producing GNU sha256sum-compatible hashes on UNIX systems that don't have sha256sum but do have OpenSSL, such as stock IBM AIX.

1.- Saves a wrapper script for UNIX find that does the following:

A.- Feeds a file to openssl on SHA256 hash calculation mode

B.- Echoes the output followed by the filename

2.- Makes the file executable

3.- Runs find on a directory, only processing files, and running on each one the wrapper script that calculates SHA256 hashes

Pending is figuring out how to verify a sha256sum file on a similar environment.

chmod --reference=file1 file2
find /var/www/ -type f -print0 | xargs -0 chmod 644
find /var/www/ -type f -print0 | xargs -0 chmod 644
2013-03-28 11:10:30
User: FiloSottile
Functions: chmod find xargs
Tags: find xargs chmod
-1

xargs is a more elegant approach to executing a command on find results then -exec as -exec is meant as a filtering flag.

chmod u+x **/*.sh
pwd|grep -o '/'|perl -ne '$x.="./.";print`readlink -f $x`'|xargs -tn1 chmod 755
2013-03-14 12:03:44
Functions: chmod grep perl pwd xargs
0

`pwd` returns the current path

`grep -o` prints each slash on new line

perl generates the paths sequence: './.', './../.', ...

`readlink` canonicalizes paths (it makes the things more transparent)

`xargs -tn1` applies chmod for each of them. Each command applied is getting printed to STDERR.

read -p 'Script: ' S && C=$S.crypt H='eval "$((dd if=$0 bs=1 skip=//|gpg -d)2>/dev/null)"; exit;' && gpg -c<$S|cat >$C <(echo $H|sed s://:$(echo "$H"|wc -c):) - <(chmod +x $C)
2013-03-10 08:59:45
User: rodolfoap
Functions: cat chmod echo gpg read sed wc
7

(Please see sample output for usage)

Use any script name (the read command gets it) and it will be encrypted with the extension .crypt, i.e.:

myscript --> myscript.crypt

You can execute myscript.crypt only if you know the password. If you die, your script dies with you.

If you modify the startup line, be careful with the offset calculation of the crypted block (the XX string).

Not difficult to make script editable (an offset-dd piped to a gpg -d piped to a vim - piped to a gpg -c directed to script.new ), but not enough space to do it on a one liner.

Sorry for the chmod on parentheses, I dont like "-" at the end.

Thanks flatcap for the subshell abbreviation to /dev/null

echo "eval \"\$(dd if=\$0 bs=1 skip=XX 2>/dev/null|gpg -d 2>/dev/null)\"; exit" > script.secure; sed -i s:XX:$(stat -c%s script.secure): script.secure; gpg -c < script.bash >> script.secure; chmod +x script.secure
2013-03-09 11:16:48
User: rodolfoap
Functions: chmod echo gpg sed stat
6

(Please see sample output for usage)

script.bash is your script, which will be crypted to script.secure

script.bash --> script.secure

You can execute script.secure only if you know the password. If you die, your script dies with you.

If you modify the startup line, be careful with the offset calculation of the crypted block (the XX string).

Not difficult to make script editable (an offset-dd piped to a gpg -d piped to a vim - piped to a gpg -c directed to script.new ), but not enough space to do it on a one liner.

find ./ -name "*.sh" -exec chmod +x {} \;
2013-02-25 17:14:55
User: Renato
Functions: chmod find
0

This command is useful to recursively make executable all "*.sh" files in a folder.

This command is useful to apply chmod recursively in a determined kind of file.

echo '#!/bin/bash' > junk.sh ; find . -iname *.pdf -type f -printf \p\s\2\a\s\c\i\i\ \"%p\"\ \ \"%p\.\t\x\u\"\;\ \p\a\r\ \<\"%p\.\t\x\u\"\ \>\"%p\.\t\x\t\"\ \;\ \r\m\ \"%p\.\t\x\u\"\ \\n >>junk.sh; chmod 766 junk.sh; ./junk.sh ; rm junk.sh
2013-01-27 21:29:08
User: p0g0
Functions: chmod echo find rm
0

Linux users wanting to extract text from PDF files in the current directory and its sub-directories can use this command. It requires "bash", "ps2ascii" and "par", and the PARINIT environment variable sanely set (see man par). WARNING: the file "junk.sh" will be created, run, and destroyed in the current directory, so you _must_ have sufficient rights. Edit the command if you need to avoid using the file name "junk.sh"

find site/ -type d | xargs sudo chmod 755
find ./ -type f | xargs sudo chmod 644
find . -type f -exec file '{}' + | grep shell | awk -F':' '{print $1}' | xargs chmod u+x
2012-08-09 18:53:08
User: llebegue
Functions: awk chmod file find grep xargs
0

Allows to change 'shell' compatible files execution bit even if their name is not *.sh

find . -type f -name "*.sh" -exec chmod u+x {} \;
chown davidp:users /some/long/path/file && chmod g+rx $_
2012-06-20 16:40:14
Functions: chmod chown
Tags: $_
0

Using $_ in the chmod command saved a good bit of typing ? obviously the $_ will contain the path to the file we?re talking about, as it was the last argument to the previous command.

source: http://www.preshweb.co.uk/2007/07/bashs-_-variable-last-argument/

find . -type f -exec chmod a-x {} +
2012-06-11 12:50:56
User: sanmiguel
Functions: chmod find
Tags: find xargs chmod
4

Using `-exec cmd {} +` causes find to build the command using all matching filenames before execution, rather than once per file.

find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 chmod a-x
2012-06-11 07:28:30
User: jlaunay
Functions: chmod find xargs
-2

Using xargs is usually much quicker as it does not have to execute chmod for every file

find . -type f -exec chmod a-x {} \;
find $HOME -type d -perm 777 -exec chmod 755 {} \; -print