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Commands tagged vim from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged vim - 140 results
git status --porcelain | sed -ne 's/^ M //p' | tr '\n' '\0' | tr -d '"' | xargs -0 vim
2014-05-08 08:36:27
User: uschrisf
Functions: sed tr xargs
Tags: vim git
0

Works even with spaces in filenames.

As an alias in .gitconfig:

[alias]

editchanged = "!git status --porcelain | sed -ne 's/^ M //p' | tr '\\n' '\\0' | tr -d '\"' | xargs -0 vim"

vim +"bufdo norm gg=G" +wa +qa FILES
2013-12-06 22:15:24
User: pjump
Functions: vim
0

The equivalent of opening each file in vim and doing

gg=G:wq . Bufdo makes it faster by obviating the need to start vim for each file separately.

:set nu
2013-10-07 22:29:10
User: killermike
Tags: vim vi
0

you don't have to spell out numbers, you can just use nu

:set number
2013-10-07 15:03:52
User: sonic
Tags: vim vi
0

Prints line numbers making it easier to see long lines that wrap in your terminal and extra line breaks at the end of a file.

:set nu

works too.

:w !sudo tee %
:r scp://yourhost//your/file
2013-09-16 08:09:53
User: Zulu
Tags: vim scp
1

Like vim scp://yourhost//your/file but in vim cmds.

:v/./d
2013-09-08 23:22:02
User: MarxBro
Tags: vim
5

If you need to delete lines that may contain space characters (such as tabs or spaces) as well as empty ones, try:

:v/\S/d

Just an alternative.

ggqqqqq/^$dd@qq@q
2013-08-16 20:37:44
User: evilsoup
Tags: vim
-2

Here's the other way of doing it in vim: setting a recursive macro. 'gg' brings you to the top of the buffer, 'qqq' clears the 'q' macro, 'qq' starts recording a macro called 'q', '/^$' moves the cursor to the next empty line, 'dd' deletes the line that the cursor is on, '@q' calls the 'q' macro (currently empty because of 'qqq'), and 'q' stops recording the macro. '@q' calls the macro.

It will run until it cannot find another blank line, at which point it will throw up an error and cease.

While this is longer than the regex, you can use it without having to move your thoughts from 'vim-mode' to 'regex-mode'.

vim $(git diff origin/master --name-only)
view /file/name
vim -R /etc/passwd
vim +143 filename.txt
vim -p `git --porcelain | awk {print $2}`
2013-04-29 21:52:23
User: cnelsonsic
Functions: awk vim
Tags: vim git
0

Opens all files in the index (modified plus not added yet) in tabs in vim.

vim sftp://[user@]host.domain.tld:[port]/[path/][file]
2013-03-24 01:31:20
User: khayyam
Functions: vim
Tags: vim
0

vim can open ssh/sftp and ftp connections for file editing using 'netrw'. If no path or file is provided vim opens the directory as a filelist.

See: :help netrw.

vim -O file1 file2
:%!xxd
2013-01-11 21:09:47
User: b1067606
Tags: vim
2

return to normal mode from hex mode

:%!xxd -r

. (in NORMAL MODE)
2013-01-08 18:32:57
User: Zulu
Tags: vim
-3

Paste what you previously wrote in INSERT MODE, for example:

1. Write 'foo' in INSERT MODE

2. Return to NORMAL MODE

3. Press "." and it will paste 'foo'

:vimgrep pattern %
2012-12-30 06:51:10
User: Sebasg
Tags: vim grep
1

Will search for the given pattern and build a list of occurrences.

Then you can use :copen and :cclose to toggle the list.

When browsing the list, ENTER will take you to that line in the file.

vim `git status --porcelain | sed -ne 's/^ M //p'`
2012-11-21 06:31:46
User: seb1245
Functions: sed vim
Tags: vim git
4

The option --porcelain makes the output of git easier to parse.

This one-liner may not work if there is a space in the modified file name.

vim `git status | grep modified | awk '{print $3}'`
2012-11-19 09:48:46
User: TetsuyO
Functions: awk grep vim
Tags: vim git
0

This oneliner gets all the 'modified' files in your git repository, and opens all of them in vim.

Very handy when you're starting to work in the morning and you simply want to review your modified files before committing them.

Maybe there are better ways to do that (and maybe integrated in vim and/or git, who knows), but I found quicker to do this oneliner.

vim $(grep [REGULAR_EXPRESSION] -R * | cut -d":" -f1 | uniq)
CTRL + A ( in normal mode )
vim -o file1 file2
vim -O file1 file2