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Commands tagged color from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged color - 49 results
color () { local color=39; local bold=0; case $1 in green) color=32;; cyan) color=36;; blue) color=34;; gray) color=37;; darkgrey) color=30;; red) color=31;; esac; if [[ "$2" == "bold" ]]; then bold=1; fi; echo -en "\033[${bold};${color}m"; }
printTextInColorRed () { echo -e '\033[01;31m\033[K'"$@"'\033[m\033[K' ;} ## print text/string in color red
2013-08-28 10:06:59
User: totti
Functions: echo
1

eg:

printTextInColorRed foo bar

foo bar [in red color]

echo -e "\e[3$(( $RANDOM * 6 / 32767 + 1 ))mHello World!"
2013-07-28 13:01:12
User: nst
Functions: echo
Tags: bash color random
0

The expression $(( $RANDOM * 6 / 32767 + 1 )) generates a random number between 1 and 6, which is then inserted into the escape sequence \e[3_m to switch the foreground color of the terminal to either red, green, yellow, blue, purple or cyan.

The color can be reset using the escape sequence \e[0m.

The full list of colors can be found here: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Color_Bash_Prompt#List_of_colors_for_prompt_and_Bash

color()(set -o pipefail;"$@" 2>&1>&3|sed $'s,.*,\e[31m&\e[m,'>&2)3>&1
for code in $(seq -w 0 255); do for attr in 0 1; do printf "%s-%03s %bTest%b\n" "${attr}" "${code}" "\e[${attr};38;05;${code}m" "\e[m"; done; done | column -c $((COLUMNS*2))
2013-01-13 18:23:44
User: claudius
Functions: column printf seq
Tags: bash color colors
0

Shows the ?rendering? for each of the 256 colours in both the bold and normal variant. Using seq is helpful to get even lines, passing $((COLUMNS*2)) to column sort-of-handles the nonprintable characters.

sed -r "s@\^\[{1,2}([0-9]{1,2}(;[0-9]{1,2})?(;[0-9])?(m|K){1,2})?@@g"
2012-11-29 18:42:32
User: malathion
Functions: sed
0

Catches some background colors missed by the highest rated alternative.

while true; do printf "\e[32m%X\e[0m" $((RANDOM%2)); for ((i=0; i<$((RANDOM%128)); i++)) do printf " "; done; done
2012-11-27 10:40:42
User: seb1245
Functions: printf
0

Unlike other alternatives, this command only relies on bash builtins and should also work on windows platforms with the bash executable.

Sparseness corresponds to the number 128 and can be adjusted. To print all possible digits instead of only 0 and 1 replace RANDOM%2 by RANDOM%10 or RANDOM%16 to add letters [A-F].

perl -E 'say $_,`tput setb $_`," "x(`tput cols`-length("$_")),`tput sgr0` for 0..(`tput colors`-1)'
2012-11-22 01:55:51
User: MarxBro
Functions: perl
Tags: perl color tput
3

Using perl and tput, show all the colors with numbers that your actual $TERM can handle.

If want to remove the numbers at beginning of new line, it should be something like this:

perl -E 'say `tput setb $_`," "x `tput cols`, `tput sgr0` for 0 .. (`tput colors` - 1)'
#!/bin/zsh SHL='\\e[0;31m' EHL='\\e[0m' while read line; do TEXT=$line for SSTR in $*; do TEXT=$(echo $TEXT | sed -e "s:$SSTR:${SHL}${SSTR}${EHL}:g") done echo -e $TEXT done
(set -o noglob;while sleep 0.05;do for r in `grep -ao '[[:print:]]' /dev/urandom|head -$((COLUMNS/3))`;do [ $((RANDOM%6)) -le 1 ] && r=\ ;echo -ne "\e[$((RANDOM%7/-6+2));32m $r ";done;echo;done)
2012-04-13 02:09:10
User: khopesh
Functions: echo head set sleep
0

A tweak using Patola's code as a base, this full-width green matrix display has all the frills (and all the printable characters).

You don't need the surrounding parens if you don't care about losing globbing capabilities. Z-shell (/bin/zsh) needs neither the parens nor the `set -o noglob`

Screen shot (animated): http://desmond.imageshack.us/Himg32/scaled.php?server=32&filename=matrixh.gif&res=landing

If it's too slow, try lowering the `sleep 0.05` or even replacing it with `true` (which is faster than `sleep 0`).

I squashed it as narrow as I could to conserve space, though somebody could probably squeeze a char or two out.

Enjoy!

open R,"curl -s http://feeds2.feedburner.com/Command-line-fu|xml2|"; while(<R>){ chomp; m(^/rss/channel/item/title=) and do{ s/^.*?=//; ($t,$d,$l)=($_,undef,undef) }; m(^/rss/channel/item/description=) and do{ s/^.*?=//; push @d,$_ }; m(^/rss/channel/item
cmdfu(){ local TCF="/var/tmp/cmdfu"; echo " Searching..."; curl "http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/matching/$(echo "$@" | sed 's/ /-/g')/$(echo -n $@ | base64)/plaintext" --silent > "$TCF"; vim -c "set filetype=sh" -RM "$TCF"; rm "$TCF"; }
wdiff -n -w $'\033[30;41m' -x $'\033[0m' -y $'\033[30;42m' -z $'\033[0m' oldversion.txt newversion.txt
2011-11-10 18:35:41
User: abracadabra
Tags: diff color wdiff
0

Requires wdiff. Prints the word-by-word diff with the old version highlighted in red, and the new in green. Change the colors by altering 41m and 42m. 45m is more of a magenta and may be easier to read.

fail () { ln -s /nonexistent 0_FAIL_${1}; }
2011-11-06 20:14:33
User: pipeliner
Functions: ln
Tags: ls color link fail
0

If you use colored ls(1), the broken symbolic links significantly differ from regular files and directories in the ls listing. In my case it is bright red. 0 is for getting the first place in the list.

echo "export LESS_TERMCAP_mb=$'\E[01;31m'" >> ~/.bashrc
2011-10-20 17:34:14
User: totti
Functions: echo
Tags: man less color
15

Add the followin to ~/.bashrc

#colour

export LESS_TERMCAP_mb=$'\E[01;31m'

export LESS_TERMCAP_md=$'\E[01;37m'

export LESS_TERMCAP_me=$'\E[0m'

export LESS_TERMCAP_se=$'\E[0m'

export LESS_TERMCAP_so=$'\E[01;44;33m'

export LESS_TERMCAP_ue=$'\E[0m'

export LESS_TERMCAP_us=$'\E[01;32m'

export GREP_OPTIONS='--color=auto'
2011-07-24 01:32:10
User: h3xx
Functions: export
Tags: color grep
1

This will affect all invocations of grep, even when it is called from inside a script.

mycommand 2> >(while read line; do echo -e "\e[01;31m$line\e[0m"; done)
2010-12-30 21:42:42
User: confiq
Functions: echo read
Tags: color stderr
19

in case you run some command in CLI and would like to take read strerr little bit better, you can use the following command. It's also possible to grep it if necessary....

( x=`tput op` y=`printf %$((${COLUMNS}-6))s`;for i in {0..256};do o=00$i;echo -e ${o:${#o}-3:3} `tput setaf $i;tput setab $i`${y// /=}$x;done; )
7

This is super fast and an easy way to test your terminal for 256 color support. Unlike alot of info about changing colors in the terminal, this uses the ncurses termcap/terminfo database to determine the escape codes used to generate the colors for a specific TERM. That means you can switch your terminal and then run this to check the real output.

tset xterm-256color

at any rate that is some super lean code!

Here it is in function form to stick in your .bash_profile

aa_256 ()

{

( x=`tput op` y=`printf %$((${COLUMNS}-6))s`;

for i in {0..256};

do

o=00$i;

echo -e ${o:${#o}-3:3} `tput setaf $i;tput setab $i`${y// /=}$x;

done )

}

From my bash_profile: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

for i in {0..255}; do echo -e "\e[38;05;${i}m${i}"; done | column -c 80 -s ' '; echo -e "\e[m"
2010-07-21 17:30:36
User: cout
Functions: column echo
8

I like the other three versions but one uses nested loops and another prints every color on a separate line. Both versions fail to reset colors before giving the prompt back.

This version uses the column command to print a table so all the colors fit on one screen. It also resets colors back to normal before as a last step.

for code in {0..255}; do echo -e "\e[38;05;${code}m $code: Test"; done
2010-06-19 02:14:42
User: scribe
Functions: echo
Tags: bash color colors
40

Same as http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/5876, but for bash.

This will show a numerical value for each of the 256 colors in bash. Everything in the command is a bash builtin, so it should run on any platform where bash is installed. Prints one color per line. If someone is interested in formatting the output, paste the alternative.

L(){ l=`builtin printf %${2:-$COLUMNS}s` && echo -e "${l// /${1:-=}}"; }
2

One of the first functions programmers learn is how to print a line. This is my 100% bash builtin function to do it, which makes it as optimal as a function can be. The COLUMNS environment variable is also set by bash (including bash resetting its value when you resize your term) so its very efficient. I like pretty-output in my shells and have experimented with several ways to output a line the width of the screen using a minimal amount of code. This is like version 9,000 lol.

This function is what I use, though when using colors or other terminal features I create separate functions that call this one, since this is the lowest level type of function. It might be better named printl(), but since I use it so much it's more optimal to have the name contain less chars (both for my programming and for the internal workings).

If you do use terminal escapes this will reset to default.

tput sgr0

For implementation ideas, check my

http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

G=$(stty -g);stty rows $((${LINES:-50}/2));top -n1; stty $G;unset G
3

One of my favorite ways to impress newbies (and old hats) to the power of the shell, is to give them an incredibly colorful and amazing version of the top command that runs once upon login, just like running fortune on login. It's pretty sweet believe me, just add this one-liner to your ~/.bash_profile -- and of course you can set the height to be anything, from 1 line to 1000!

G=$(stty -g);stty rows $((${LINES:-50}/2));top -n1; stty $G;unset G

Doesn't take more than the below toprc file I've added below, and you get all 4 top windows showing output at the same time.. each with a different color scheme, and each showing different info. Each window would normally take up 1/4th of your screen when run like that - TOP is designed as a full screen program. But here's where you might learn something new today on this great site.. By using the stty command to change the terminals internal understanding of the size of your terminal window, you force top to also think that way as well.

# save the correct settings to G var.

G=$(stty -g)

# change the number of rows to half the actual amount, or 50 otherwise

stty rows $((${LINES:-50}/2))

# run top non-interactively for 1 second, the output stays on the screen (half at least)

top -n1

# reset the terminal back to the correct values, and clean up after yourself

stty $G;unset G

This trick from my [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html bash_profile ], though the online version will be updated soon. Just think what else you could run like this!

Note 1: I had to edit the toprc file out due to this site can't handle that (uploads/including code). So you can grab it from [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash-power-prompt.html my site ]

Note 2: I had to come back and edit again because the links weren't being correctly parsed

termtrace(){( strace -s 1000 -e write tput $@ 2>&2 2>&1 ) | grep -o '"[^"]*"';}
2010-03-17 08:53:41
User: AskApache
Functions: grep strace tput write
3

Depending on the TERM, the terminfo version, ncurses version, etc.. you may be using a varied assortment of terminal escape codes. With this command you can easily find out exactly what is going on.. This is terminal escape zen!

( 2>&2 strace -f -F -e write -s 1000 sh -c 'echo -e "initc\nis2\ncnorm\nrmso\nsgr0" | tput -S' 2>&1 ) | grep -o '"\\[^"]*"' --color=always

"\33]4;%p1%d;rgb:%p2%{255}%*%{1000}%/%2.2X/%p3%{255}%*%{1000}%/%2.2X/%p4%{255}%*%{1000}%/%2.2X\33\\\33[!p\33[?3;4l\33[4l\33>\33[?12l\33[?25h\33[27m\33(B\33[m"

Lets say you want to find out what you need to echo in order to get the text to blink..

echo -e "`tput blink`This will blink`tput sgr0` This wont"

Now you can use this function instead of calling tput (tput is much smarter for portable code because it works differently depending on the current TERM, and tput -T anyterm works too.) to turn that echo into a much faster executing code. tput queries files, opens files, etc.. but echo is very strait and narrow.

So now you can do this:

echo -e "\33[5mThis will blink\33(B\33[m This wont"

More at http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

echo -ne "\e[32m" ; while true ; do echo -ne "\e[$(($RANDOM % 2 + 1))m" ; tr -c "[:print:]" " " < /dev/urandom | dd count=1 bs=50 2> /dev/null ; done
2009-12-19 19:05:04
User: psykotron
Functions: dd echo tr true
Tags: color
4

A bit different from some of the other submissions. Has bold and uses all c printable characters. Change the bs=value to speed up and increase the sizes of the bold and non-bold strings.

p(){ printf "\033[%d;%dH\033[4%dm \033[m" $((RANDOM%LINES+1)) $((RANDOM%COLUMNS+1)) $((RANDOM%8)); }; clear;while :;do p; sleep .001;done