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Commands using egrep from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using egrep - 192 results
sudo lsof | egrep 'w.+REG' | awk '{print $10}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -n
2015-08-18 14:09:02
User: kennethjor
Functions: awk egrep sort sudo uniq
1

This command run fine on my Ubuntu machine, but on Red Hat I had to change the awk command to `awk '{print $10}'`.

egrep 'word1.*word2' --color /path/file.log |more
2015-04-28 15:09:45
User: alissonf
Functions: egrep
0

grep for 2 words existing on the same line

dmidecode --type 9 |egrep 'Bus Address|Designation'
2015-01-27 15:13:59
User: mhs
Functions: egrep
Tags: dmidecode
1

Recent hardware may or may not enumerate *both of* these values

ls -l /dev/disk/by-id |grep -v "wwn-" |egrep "[a-zA-Z]{3}$" |sed 's/\.\.\/\.\.\///' |sed -E 's/.*[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}\s//' |sed -E 's/->\ //' |sort -k2 |awk '{print $2,$1}' |sed 's/\s/\t/'
2015-01-25 19:29:40
User: lig0n
Functions: awk egrep grep ls sed sort
Tags: zfs disk info
0

This is much easier to parse and do something else with (eg: automagically create ZFS vols) than anything else I've found. It also helps me keep track of which disks are which, for example, when I want to replace a disk, or image headers in different scenarios. Being able to match a disk to the kernels mapping of said drive the disks serial number is very helpful

ls -l /dev/disk/by-id

Normal `ls` command to list contents of /dev/disk/by-id

grep -v "wwn-"

Perform an inverse search - that is, only output non-matches to the pattern 'wwn-'

egrep "[a-zA-Z]{3}$"

A regex grep, looking for three letters and the end of a line (to filter out fluff)

sed 's/\.\.\/\.\.\///'

Utilize sed (stream editor) to remove all occurrences of "../../"

sed -E 's/.*[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}\s//'

Strip out all user and permission fluff. The -E option lets us use extended (modern) regex notation (larger control set)

sed -E 's/->\ //'

Strip out ascii arrows "-> "

sort -k2

Sort the resulting information alphabetically, on column 2 (the disk letters)

awk '{print $2,$1}'

Swap the order of the columns so it's easier to read/utilize output from

sed 's/\s/\t/'

Replace the space between the two columns with a tab character, making the output more friendly

For large ZFS pools, this made creating my vdevs immeasurably easy. By keeping track of which disks were in which slot (spreadsheet) via their serial numbers, I was able to then create my vols simply by copying and pasting the full output of the disk (not the letter) and pasting it into my command. Thereby allowing me to know exactly which disk, in which slot, was going into the vdev. Example command below.

zpool create tank raidz2 -o ashift=12 ata-... ata-... ata-... ata-... ata-... ata-...
psg(){ ps aux | grep -v grep | egrep -e "$1|USER"; }
2014-12-31 22:27:27
Functions: egrep grep ps
Tags: grep function ps
-1

Function that searchs a process by its name and shows in the terminal.

* Shows the Header for reference

* Hides the process 'grep' from the list

* Case sensitive

du -hs * |egrep -i "^(\s?\d+\.?\d+G)"
2014-12-09 15:23:21
User: krizzo
Functions: du egrep
Tags: size sort du
0

This will list all the files that are a gigabyte or larger in the current working directory. Change the G in the regex to be a M and you'll find all files that are a megabyte up to but not including a gigabyte.

netstat -nr|egrep -v "Routing|Interface|lo0"|awk '{print $5}'|sort -u| while read l; do ifconfig $l ; echo " Station Addr: `lanscan -ia|grep "$l "|cut -d ' ' -f 1`" ; done
dumpe2fs -h /dev/xvda1 | egrep -i 'mount count|check'
2014-10-22 08:38:43
User: manju712
Functions: dumpe2fs egrep
0

To check the total number of mounts, maximum number of mounts before performing the fsck and last time when the fsck was performed.

egrep -wi --color 'warning|error|critical'
cat /usr/share/dict/words | egrep '^\w{13,}$' | egrep -iv '(\w).*\1'
2014-09-29 12:52:09
User: hackerb9
Functions: cat egrep
6

This is the most straightforward approach: first regexp limits dictionary file to words with thirteen or more characters, second regexp discards any words that have a letter repeated. (Bonus challenge: Try doing it in a single regexp!)

finger $(whoami) | egrep -o 'Name: [a-zA-Z0-9 ]{1,}' | cut -d ':' -f 2 | xargs echo
2014-09-24 01:22:07
User: swebber
Functions: cut egrep finger xargs
0

Its possible to user a simple regex to extract de username from the finger command.

The final echo its optional, just for remove the initial space

ifconfig | egrep -A2 "eth|wlan" | tr -d "\n"| sed 's/\-\-/\n/g'|awk '{print "mac: "$5 " " $7}' | sed 's/addr:/addr: /g'
ethtool -S eth0 | egrep "(drop|disc|err|fifo|buf|fail|miss|OOB|fcs|full|frags|hdr|tso).*: [^0]"
2014-07-15 05:27:34
User: suprjami
Functions: egrep
0

A grep against ethtool to look for common errors and packet loss statistics which network drivers report in their private data, which is queried with ethool -S. This is the current grep used in xsos (https://github.com/ryran/xsos), which I originally contributed and has been improved by the community over time.

cut -f 2 -d ':' oclHashcat.pot | egrep -oi '[a-z]{1,20}' | sort | uniq > base.pot
grep "btrfs: checksum error at logical" /var/log/messages | egrep -o "[^ ]+$" | tr -d ')' | sort | uniq
2014-07-01 08:15:26
User: jcoll
Functions: egrep grep sort tr
0

Filter entries in OpenSuse /var/log/messages like:

timestamp servername kernel: [83242.108090] btrfs: checksum error at logical 1592344576 on dev /dev/sda5, sector 5223584, root 5, inode 2652, offset 282624, length 4096, links 1 (path: log/warn)

echo $(ifconfig) | egrep -o "en.*?inet [^ ]* " | sed 's/.*inet \(.*\)$/\1/' | tail -n +2
read -p "Please enter the 4chan url: "|egrep '//i.4cdn.org/[a-z0-9]+/src/([0-9]*).(jpg|png|gif)' - -o|nl -s https:|cut -c7-|uniq|wget -nc -i - --random-wait
function colorize() { c="--line-buffered --color=yes"; GREP_COLORS="mt=01;34" egrep $c '(^| 200 | 304 )' "${@}" | GREP_COLORS="mt=02;31" egrep $c '(^|"(GET|POST) .*[^0-9] 4[0-1][0-9] )' | GREP_COLORS="ms=02;37" egrep $c '(^|^[0-9\.]+) ';}
2013-08-14 21:05:34
User: mogsie
Functions: egrep
1

Puts a splash of color in your access logs. IP addresses are gray, 200 and 304 are green, all 4xx errors are red. Works well with e.g. "colorize access_log | less -R" if you want to see your colors while paging.

Use as inspiration for other things you might be tailing, like syslog or vmstat

Usage:

tail -f access.log | colorize
ifconfig | egrep [0-9A-Za-z]{2}\(:[0-9A-Za-z]{2}\){5} | awk '{print $1 ":\t" $5}'
2013-07-30 17:02:07
User: jaimeanrm
Functions: awk egrep ifconfig
1

Is the better option on a Open SuSE Box

while read X ; do printf "$X --"; virsh dumpxml $X | egrep "source dev|source file"; done< <(virsh list | awk '$1 ~ /^[1-9]/ { print $2 }')
2013-07-29 17:32:59
User: hugme
Functions: awk egrep printf read
0

This will strip out the relivent disk information from kvm. I'm using it to find disks on a SAN which are no longer in use.

mysql -e 'show databases' -s --skip-column-names | egrep -v "^(test|mysql|performance_schema|information_schema)$" | parallel --gnu "mysqldump --routines {} > {}_daily.sql"
2013-07-24 15:37:58
User: intel352
Functions: egrep
1

Backs up all databases, excluding test, mysql, performance_schema, information_schema.

Requires parallel to work, install parallel on Ubuntu by running: sudo aptitude install parallel

netstat -tn | awk '{print $5}' | egrep -v '(localhost|\*\:\*|Address|and|servers|fff|127\.0\.0)' | sed 's/:[0-99999999].*//g'
2013-06-13 14:35:38
User: kehansen
Functions: awk egrep netstat sed
0

I used this to get all the remote connection ip addresses connected to my server... I had to start storing and tracking this data so thats why i built this out... probably not optimal as far as the egrep regex but it works ;)

git branch -r | awk '{print $1}' | egrep -v -f /dev/fd/0 <(git branch -vv | grep origin) | awk '{print $1}' | xargs git branch -d
iwlist ath0 scanning |egrep '(ESSID|Signal|Address)'| \sed -e 's/Cell - Address:*//g' -e 's/ESSID://g' \-e 's/Noise level=-//g' -e 's/dBm//g' \-e 's/Quality=*//g' -e 's/Signal level=-//g' \-e 's/"//g'
svn ls -R | egrep -v -e "\/$" | xargs svn blame | awk '{count[$2]++}END{for(j in count) print count[j] "\t" j}' | sort -rn
2013-05-03 01:45:12
User: kurzum
Functions: awk egrep ls sort xargs
Tags: svn count
0

This one has a better performance, as it is a one pass count with awk. For this script it might not matter, but for others it is a good optiomization.