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Commands tagged fonts from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged fonts - 5 results
grep 'font-family:[^;]*' <input file.svg> | sed 's/.*font-family:\([^;]*\).*/\1/g' | sort | uniq
2014-11-03 20:38:08
User: caiosba
Functions: grep sed sort
Tags: fonts svg
0

List all fonts used by an SVG file. Useful to find out which fonts you need to have installed in order to open/edit an SVG file appropriately.

figlet -f roman message
xset fp+ /Applications/Mathematica.app/SystemFiles/Fonts/Type1/
d="www.dafont.com/alpha.php?";for c in {a..z}; do l=`curl -s "${d}lettre=${c}"|sed -n 's/.*ge=\([0-9]\{2\}\).*/\1/p'`;for((p=1;p<=l;p++));do for u in `curl -s "${d}page=${p}&lettre=${c}"|egrep -o "http\S*.com/dl/\?f=\w*"`;do aria2c "${u}";done;done;done
2010-05-18 07:38:54
User: lrvick
Functions: c++ egrep sed
9

Requires aria2c but could just as easily wget or anything else.

A great way to build up a nice font collection for Gimp without having to waste a lot of time. :-)

shopt -s extglob; for f in *.ttf *.TTF; do g=$(showttf "$f" 2>/dev/null | grep -A1 "language=0.*FullName" | tail -1 | rev | cut -f1 | rev); g=${g##+( )}; mv -i "$f" "$g".ttf; done
2

Just a quick hack to give reasonable filenames to TrueType and OpenType fonts.

I'd accumulated a big bunch of bizarrely and inconsistently named font files in my ~/.fonts directory. I wanted to copy some, but not all, of them over to my new machine, but I had no idea what many of them were. This script renames .ttf files based on the name embedded inside the font. It will also work for .otf files, but make sure you change the mv part so it gives them the proper extension.

REQUIREMENTS: Bash (for extended pattern globbing), showttf (Debian has it in the fontforge-extras package), GNU grep (for context), and rev (because it's hilarious).

BUGS: Well, like I said, this is a quick hack. It grew piece by piece on the command line. I only needed to do this once and spent hardly any time on it, so it's a bit goofy. For example, I find 'rev | cut -f1 | rev' pleasantly amusing --- it seems so clearly wrong, and yet it works to print the last argument. I think flexibility in expressiveness like this is part of the beauty of Unix shell scripting. One-off tasks can be be written quickly, built-up as a person is "thinking aloud" at the command line. That's why Unix is such a huge boost to productivity: it allows each person to think their own way instead of enforcing some "right way".

On a tangent: One of the things I wish commandlinefu would show is the command line HISTORY of the person as they developed the script. I think it's that conversation between programmer and computer, as the pipeline is built piece-by-piece, that is the more valuable lesson than any canned script.