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Commands tagged egrep from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged egrep - 25 results
ifconfig | egrep [0-9A-Za-z]{2}\(:[0-9A-Za-z]{2}\){5} | awk '{print $1 ":\t" $5}'
2013-07-30 17:02:07
User: jaimeanrm
Functions: awk egrep ifconfig
1

Is the better option on a Open SuSE Box

egrep -v '(\t)?#.*|^$' /etc/apache2/sites-available/default
egrep '.*(("STATUS)|("HEAD)).*' http_access.2012.07.18.log | awk '{sum+=$11; ++n} END {print "Tot="sum"("n")";print "Avg="sum/n}'
2012-07-27 12:18:29
User: fanchok
Functions: awk egrep
0

Depending on your Apache access log configuration you may have to change the sum+=$11 to previous or next awk token.

Beware, usually in access log last token is time of response in microseconds, penultimate token is size of response in bytes. You may use this command line to calculate sum and average of responses sizes.

You can also refine the egrep regexp to match specific HTTP requests.

egrep -v "^\s*(#|$)" myfile.cfg
2011-12-08 15:25:17
User: dan
Functions: egrep
Tags: egrep comment
2

Does not print any line that either:

- is empty

- contains only spaces or tabs

- starts with #

- starts with spaces/tabs followed by a #

for file in *.mp4; do mv "$file" "${file%.*} [$(cksfv -b -q "$file" | egrep -o "\b[A-F0-9]{8}\b$")].${file#*.}"; done
sed -e 's/#.*//;/^\s*$/d'
grep -Pv '^\S*(#|$)'
egrep -i " connected|card detect|primary dev" /var/log/Xorg.0.log
2011-02-24 18:04:04
User: axelabs
Functions: egrep
Tags: video egrep xorg
-1

The above one liner can be used to determine what card/driver is Xorg currently using. For additional information, see http://goo.gl/mDnWu

lsof -nP -c COMMAND | egrep -o '(TCP|UDP).*$' | sort -u
2011-01-25 12:04:13
User: forcefsck
Functions: egrep sort
Tags: egrep lsof udp tcp
0

Where COMMAND is the process(es) name. I prefer to get all states but you may add ESTABLISHED in the grep regex.

lsof -c apache2 | egrep -o 'TCP.*ESTABLISHED.*$'

-nP flags are optional and UDP is irrelevant for established connections

Similar but using the process id:

lsof -nP -p PID | egrep -o '(TCP|UDP).*$'
find | egrep "\.(ade|adp|bat|chm|cmd|com|cpl|dll|exe|hta|ins|isp|jse|lib|mde|msc|msp|mst|pif|scr|sct|shb|sys|vb|vbe|vbs|vxd|wsc|wsf|wsh)$"
2010-11-23 16:53:55
User: poulter7
Functions: egrep find
-1

Returns any file in the folder which would be rejected by Gmail, if you were to send zipped version.

(Yes, you could just zip it and knock the extension off and put it back on the other side, but for some people this just isn't a solution)

sleep 4; xwd >foo.xwd; mv foo.xwd "$(dd skip=100 if=foo.xwd bs=1 count=256 2>/dev/null | egrep -ao '^[[:print:]]+' | tr / :).xwd"
2010-09-19 08:03:02
User: hackerb9
Functions: mv sleep
3

In general, this is actually not better than the "scrot -d4" command I'm listing it as an alternative to, so please don't vote it down for that. I'm adding this command because xwd (X window dumper) comes with X11, so it is already installed on your machine, whereas scrot probably is not. I've found xwd handy on boxen that I don't want to (or am not allowed to) install packages on.

NOTE: The dd junk for renaming the file is completely optional. I just did that for fun and because it's interesting that xwd embeds the window title in its metadata. I probably should have just parsed the output from file(1) instead of cutting it out with dd(1), but this was more fun and less error prone.

NOTE2: Many programs don't know what to do with an xwd format image file. You can convert it to something normal using NetPBM's xwdtopnm(1) or ImageMagick's convert(1). For example, this would work: "xwd | convert fd:0 foo.jpg". Of course, if you have ImageMagick already installed, you'd probably use import(1) instead of xwd.

NOTE3: Xwd files can be viewed using the X Window UnDumper: "xwud <foo.xwd". ImageMagick and The GIMP can also read .xwd files. Strangely, eog(1) cannot.

NOTE4: The sleep is not strictly necessary, I put it in there so that one has time to raise the window above any others before clicking on it.

egrep '(\[error\])+.*(PHP)+' /var/log/apache2/error.log
for f in t1.bmp t2.jpg t3.tga; do echo ${f%.*}.png; done
2010-07-09 00:38:53
User: zed
Functions: echo
7

The above is just a prove of concept based around the nested bash substitution. This could be useful in situations where you're in a directory with many filetypes but you only want to convert a few.

for f in *.bmp *.jpg *.tga; do convert $f ${f%.*}.png; done

or you can use ls | egrep to get more specific... but be warned, files with spaces will cause a ruckus with expansion but the bash for loop uses a space delimited list.

for f in $(ls | egrep "bmp$|jpg$|tga$"); do convert $f ${f%.*}.png; done

I'm guessing some people will still prefer doing it the sed way but I thought the concept of this one was pretty neat. It will help me remember bash substitutions a little better :-P

(for i in `find . -maxdepth 2 -name .svn | sed 's/.svn$//'`; do echo $i; svn info $i; done ) | egrep '^.\/|^URL'
2010-05-09 11:54:37
User: jespere
Functions: echo egrep info sed
0

If you have lots of subversion working copies in one directory and want to see in which repositories they are stored, this will do the trick. Can be convenient if you need to move to a new subversion server.

X='pattern'; vim +/"$X" `egrep -lr "$X" *`
printf "\n%25s%10sTOTAL\n" 'FILE TYPE' ' '; for ext in $(find . -iname \*.* | egrep -o '\.[^[:space:].]+$' | egrep -v '\.svn*' | sort -f | uniq -i); do count=$(find . -iname \*$ext | wc -l); printf "%25s%10s%d\n" $ext ' ' $count; done
2010-04-16 21:12:11
User: rkulla
Functions: egrep find printf sort uniq wc
0

I created this command to give me a quick overview of how many file types a directory, and all its subdirectories, contains. It works based off file extension, rather than file(1)'s magic output, because it ended up being more accurate and less confusing.

Files that don't have an ext (README) are generally not important for me to want to count, but you're free to customize this fit your needs.

ls -d .*
echo .*
printf "%s\n" .*
ls -a | egrep "^\.\w"
2009-11-11 18:19:56
User: kulor
Functions: egrep ls
Tags: egrep ls dotfiles
-2

trying to copy all your dotfiles from one location to another, this may help

lynx -head -dump http://slashdot.org|egrep 'Bender|Fry'|sed 's/X-//'
egrep -o '[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}' file.txt
egrep -v "^$|^[[:space:]]*#" /etc/some/file
2009-05-12 07:14:48
User: michauko
Functions: egrep
Tags: egrep
14

Shows a file without comments (at least those starting by #)

- removes empty lines

- removes lines starting by # or "some spaces/tabs then #'"

Useful when you want to quickly see what you have to customize on a freshly installed application without reading the comments that sometimes are a full 1000 lines documentation :)

While posting, I saw this http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/1041/display-contents-of-a-file-wo-any-comments-or-blank-lines

But it's dirty and incomplete, to my mind

My original goal was to remove lines like "\t*#" but I can't figure out how to do a egrep '\t' on a command-line. Two workarounds if needed:

egrep -v 'press control + V then TAB then #' /your/file

or

egrep -v -f some_file /your/file #where some_file contains what you want to exclude, example a really inserted TAB
curl -Is slashdot.org | egrep '^X-(F|B|L)' | cut -d \- -f 2
ifconfig -a | nawk 'BEGIN {FS=" "}{RS="\n"}{ if($1~ /:/) {printf "%s ", $1}}{ if($1=="inet") {print " -- ",system("arp "$2)}}'|egrep -v "^[0-9]$"
2009-03-02 23:15:13
User: leprasmurf
Functions: ifconfig
1

Needed to get the Mac of various devices on a solaris box, but didn't have root. This command used awk to display the Network device, the IP, and the MAC a line at a time.