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Commands tagged ls from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged ls - 98 results
npm ls -g|grep "^[├└]\(.\+\)\?[┬─] "
watch -d "ls -l /proc/$!/fd"
2014-01-31 23:51:17
User: flatcap
Functions: watch
1

You're running a program that reads LOTS of files and takes a long time.

But it doesn't tell you about its progress.

First, run a command in the background, e.g.

find /usr/share/doc -type f -exec cat {} + > output_file.txt

Then run the watch command.

"watch -d" highlights the changes as they happen

In bash: $! is the process id (pid) of the last command run in the background.

You can change this to $(pidof my_command) to watch something in particular.

ls -ls -tr | tail
ls -1F | grep @$ | sed 's/@//' | column
2013-07-19 17:55:11
User: jlbknr
Functions: grep ls sed
Tags: ls symlinks
0

I use this with alias:

alias lsl="ls -1F | grep @$ | sed 's/@//' | column"

Limitation: This will also list files that happen to have an @ at the end of the filename.

$ ls -1F | grep @ | sed 's/@//' | column
2013-07-19 17:41:03
User: jlbknr
Functions: grep ls sed
Tags: ls symlinks
0

I use this with alias:

alias lsl="ls -1F | grep @ | sed 's/@//' | column"

watch 'ls -tr1 | tail -n1 | xargs tail'
2013-05-09 11:37:59
User: batandwa
Functions: tail watch xargs
Tags: tail ls xargs watch
-5

Watches for file modifications in the current directory and tails the file.

ls *.jpg | xargs -n1 -i cp {} /external-hard-drive/directory
ls -lad
2013-04-03 09:58:31
User: techie
Functions: ls
Tags: ls
-1

This will show you the permissions on the directory you are currently in

ls -tl **/*(om[1,20])
2013-03-24 00:14:03
User: khayyam
Functions: ls
Tags: ls zsh
0

zsh globbing and glob qualifier:

'**/*' = recursive

om = ouput by modification (last access)

[1,20] = twenty files.

The '-t' switch is provided to ls so that the files are ordered with the most recent at the top. For a more 'find' like output the following can be used.

print -rl **/*(om[1,20])

ls -Sh **/*(.Lm+100) | tail -5
2013-03-21 20:22:11
User: khayyam
Functions: ls tail
Tags: tail ls zsh
1

zsh: list of files sorted by size, greater than 100mb, head the top 5. '**/*' is recursive, and the glob qualifiers provide '.' = regular file, 'L' size, which is followed by 'm' = 'megabyte', and finally '+100' = a value of 100

find -type f | xargs ls -1tr
alias cls='clear;ls'
2013-03-19 12:18:47
User: opexxx
Functions: alias
Tags: ls clear
0

Clear the screen and list file

ls -lT -rt | grep "^-" | awk 'BEGIN {START=2002} (START <= $9){ print $10 ;START=$9 }' | tail -1
2013-02-24 23:39:22
User: Glamdring
Functions: awk grep ls tail
Tags: ls date osx
0

On the Mac, the 'ls' function can sort based on month/day/time, but seems to lack ability to filter on the Year field (#9 among the long listed fields). The sorted list continuously increases the 'START' year for the most recently accessed set of files. The final month printed will be the highest month that appeared in that START year. The command does its magic on the current directory, and suitably discards all entries that are themselves directories. If you expect files dating prior to 2002, change the START year accordingly.

find . -type f -size +100M
alias LS='find -mount -maxdepth 1 -printf "%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G %TF_%TR %CF_%CR %AF_%AR %#15s [%Y] %p\n" 2>/dev/null'
2013-02-06 17:54:14
User: AskApache
Functions: alias
2

This alias is super-handy for me because it quickly shows the details of each file in the current directory. The output is nice because it is sortable, allowing you to expand this basic example to do something amazing like showing you a list of the newest files, the largest files, files with bad perms, etc..

A recursive alias would be:

alias LSR='find -mount -printf "%.5m %10M %#9u:%-9g %#5U:%-5G %TF_%TR %CF_%CR %AF_%AR %#15s [%Y] %p\n" 2>/dev/null'

From: http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

ls -lhR | grep -e "total\|:$"
2013-01-22 04:58:51
User: Sebasg
Functions: grep ls
Tags: ls grep
4

ls -lhR

Lists everithing using -l "long listing format" wich includes the space used by the folder. Displays it in -h "human readable form" (i.e. 2.2G, 32K), and -R recurses subfolders.

grep -e using a regex, show lines containing the word "total" or a ":" at the end of the line (those with the name of the folder) only.

ls -l /dev/disk/by-id/ | grep '/sda$' | grep -o 'ata[^ ]*'
2013-01-16 17:28:11
User: michelsberg
Functions: grep ls
Tags: ls grep drive
0

Substitute for #11720

Can probably be even shorter and easier.

ls -lSr
ls -l /proc/*/fd/* | grep 'deleted'| grep "\/proc.*\file-name-part"
2012-09-13 09:54:16
User: totti
Functions: grep ls
0

Accidentally deleted some file while used by a program ? (Eg: a song)

Use this command to find the file handle and recover using

cp /proc/pid/fd/filehandle /new/recoverd-file.ext
alias ls='if [[ -f .hidden ]]; then while read l; do opts+=(--hide="$l"); done < .hidden; fi; ls --color=auto "${opts[@]}"'
2012-08-12 13:10:23
User: expelledboy
Functions: alias ls read
Tags: hidden ls alias
1

Sometimes I would like to see hidden files, prefix with a period, but some files or folders I never want to see (and really wish I could just remove all together).

find . -type f -exec ls -l --full-time {} + | sort -k 6,7
2012-08-03 22:22:51
User: quadcore
Functions: find ls sort
Tags: sort find ls
2

This sorts files in multiple directories by their modification date. Note that sorting is done at the end using "sort", instead of using the "-ltr" options to "ls". This ensures correct results when sorting a large number of files, in which case "find" will call "ls" multiple times.

ls -R | grep ":$" | sed -e 's/:$//' -e 's/[^-][^\/]*\//--/g' -e 's/^/ /' -e 's/-/|/'
find . -printf "%s %p\n" | sort -n
find . -ls | sort -k 7 -n
tree -ifs --noreport .|sort -n -k2
2012-05-04 09:18:39
User: knoppix5
Functions: sort
1

or

tree -ifsF --noreport .|sort -n -k2|grep -v '/$'

(rows presenting directory names become hidden)