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Commands by slashdot from sorted by
Terminal - Commands by slashdot - 6 results
while [[ COUNTER -le 10 && IFS=':' ]]; do for LINE in $(cat /tmp/list); do some_command(s) $LINE; done; COUNTER=$((COUNTER+1)); done
2010-09-01 15:09:59
User: slashdot
Functions: cat
0

At times I find that I need to loop through a file where each value that I need to do something with is not on a separate line, but rather separated with a ":" or a ";". In this instance, I create a loop within which I define 'IFS' to be something other than a whitespace character. In this example, I iterate through a file which only has one line, and several fields separated with ":". The counter helps me define how many times I want to repeat the loop.

pvscan | awk '/name_of_vg/ {print $2}' | sed 's/[-|/|]/ /g' | cut -d " " -f7
2010-06-22 16:34:42
User: slashdot
Functions: awk cut sed
-1

This is an easy way to quickly get a status for a device in multipath on SLES systems, as long as the server is configured based on Novell's standards, where multipathed disks are referred to by /dev/disk/by-... tree. Make sure to replace name_of_vg with your Volume Group name.

cat private-file | gpg2 --encrypt --armor --recipient "Disposable Key" | mailx -s "Email Subject" user@email.com
2009-10-19 20:38:37
User: slashdot
Functions: cat mailx
2

This is a quick and easy way of encrypting files in a datastream, without ever really creating an output file from gpg. Useful with cron also, when file(s) have to be sent based on a set schedule.

7z x -so testfile.tar.7z | tar tvf -
2009-07-15 21:00:58
User: slashdot
Functions: tar
2

Sometimes it is handy to be able to list contents of a tar file within a compressed archive, such as 7Zip in this instance, without having to extract the archive first. This is especially helpful when dealing with larger sized files.

tar cf - /path/to/data | 7z a -si archivename.tar.7z
2009-07-14 14:21:30
User: slashdot
Functions: tar
8

Using 7z to create archives is OK, but when you use tar, you preserve all file-specific information such as ownership, perms, etc. If that's important to you, this is a better way to do it.

gdiff --unified=10000 input.file1 inpute.file2 | egrep -v "(^\+[a-z]|^\-[a-z])"| sort > outputfile.sorted
2009-06-18 20:35:00
User: slashdot
Functions: egrep sort
-1

This commands will make it easier to select only common items between two files being compared. If your lines start with things other than lowercase a-z, adjust this Regex appropriately. Number of lines in the output has been set to no more than 10000, and should be adjusted as needed.