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Commands tagged zip from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged zip - 16 results
function rar2zip { rar="$(grealpath "$1")"; zip="$(grealpath "${2:-$(basename "$rar" .rar).zip}")"; d=$(mktemp -d /tmp/rar2zip.XXXXXX); cd "$d"; unrar x "$rar"; zip -r "$zip" *; cd -; rm -r "$d"; }
2014-05-28 07:51:17
Functions: basename cd mktemp rm
Tags: rar zip convert
0

Written on OSX after `brew install unrar coreutils`; presumably works on other unices with minimal modifications.

Didn't test rars that actually have paths in them, just "flat" files. Won't include files in the rar starting with a dot.

tar -cvf - /path/to/tar/up | xz - > myTarArchive.tar.xz
2014-03-18 19:51:50
User: razerwolf
Functions: tar
1

compress directory archive with xz compression, if tar doesn't have the -J option (OSX tar doesn't have -J)

tar -cJf myarchive.tar.xz /path/to/archive/
2014-03-13 03:34:18
User: Sepero
Functions: tar
1

Compress files or a directory to xz format. XZ has superior and faster compression than bzip2 in most cases. XZ is superior to 7zip format because it can save file permissions and other metadata data.

eval `ls -1d * | awk '{print "zip -r "$1".zip "$1";"}'`
vim some-archive.tar.gz
2012-04-20 02:37:28
User: ktonga
Functions: vim
5

If you vim a compressed file it will list all archive content, then you can pickup any of them for editing and saving. There you have the modified archive without any extra step. It supports many file types such as tar.gz, tgz, zip, etc.

find . -iname '*.zip' | while read file; do unzip -l "$file" | grep -q [internal file name] && echo $file; done
2012-03-23 18:08:35
User: ricardofunke
Functions: echo file find grep read
1

This command find which of your zip (or jar) files (when you have lots of them) contains a file you're searching for. It's useful when you have a lot of zip (or jar) files and need to know in which of them the file is archived.

It's most common with .jar files when you have to know which of the .jar files contains the java class you need.

To find in jar files, you must change "zip" to "jar" in the "find" command. The [internal file name] must be changed to the file name you're searching that is archived into one of the zip/jar files.

Before run this command you must step into the directory that contains the zip or jar files.

ls -1 | awk ' { print "zip "$1".zip " $1 } ' | sh
2011-12-14 20:30:56
User: kaywhydub
Functions: awk ls
Tags: awk zip sh
1

This will list the files in a directory, then zip each one with the original filename individually.

video1.wmv -> video1.zip

video2.wmv -> video2.zip

This was for zipping up large amounts of video files for upload on a Windows machine.

ls *.zip|awk '{$a="zip -fo "$1" FILENAME"; system($a);}'
2011-07-27 10:22:21
User: youkey
Functions: awk ls
Tags: awk zip
0

- all zips are in current folder

- FILENAME is file name that should be subsitute in all zips (new version of this file is in current folder)

zip -r new.zip dir_to_zip -x '*/dir_to_exclude1/*' -x '*/dir_to_exclude2/*'
2010-11-18 09:38:50
User: rocketraman
Tags: zip
0

This zips a directory recursively but excludes some directories within the zipped directory. Useful for excluding .svn and .git directories, or compilation targets.

tar -xfv archive.zip
2010-10-14 08:19:16
User: vxbinaca
Functions: tar
-4

Simplicity tends to win out on commandlinefu.com Also, why type multiple filenames when range operators work too. Saves finger abuse and time and reduces the chances for mistakes.

zip -F archive.zip --output big_archive.zip && unzip big_archive.zip
2010-10-09 10:20:04
User: asmanian
1

Assuming you have a multi-part archive like "archive.zip archive.z01 archive.z02 ...", unzip will not handle these correctly. If you "fix" the parts into one big file with zip -F before, it works.

git archive HEAD --format=zip > archive.zip
zip -r homard homard -x homard/.git\*; cp ./homard.zip /path_to_dropbox_public_folder/homard.zip
2010-06-30 22:19:39
User: juliend2
Functions: cp
Tags: git zip dropbox
-1

If like me you do a lot of front-end coding and you have a lot of clients that asks you some little modifications, then you send the modifications back to them in a zip file while ignoring the .git folder and .gitignore file, then copy this zip into your dropbox and send it back to them. They find out a new bug so, rince and repeat? You get the picture. It can be quite tedious.

zip -r foo.zip DIR -x "*/.svn/*"
find . -not \( -name .svn -prune \) -type f | xargs zip XXXXX.zip
tar cf - /path/to/data | 7z a -si archivename.tar.7z
2009-07-14 14:21:30
User: slashdot
Functions: tar
8

Using 7z to create archives is OK, but when you use tar, you preserve all file-specific information such as ownership, perms, etc. If that's important to you, this is a better way to do it.