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Commands tagged substitution from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged substitution - 16 results
(read -r passphrase; b58encode 80$( brainwallet_exponent "$passphrase" )$( brainwallet_checksum "$passphrase" ))
3

A bitcoin "brainwallet" is a secret passphrase you carry in the "wallet" of your brain.

The Bitcoin Brainwallet Private Key Calculator calculates the standard base58 encoded bitcoin private key from your "brainwallet" passphrase.

The private key is the most important bitcoin number. All other numbers can be derived from it.

This command uses 3 other functions - all 3 are defined on my user page:

1) brainwallet_exponent() - search for Bitcoin Brainwallet Exponent Calculator

2) brainwallet_checksum() - search for Bitcoin Brainwallet Exponent Calculator

3) b58encode() - search for Bitcoin Brainwallet Base58 Encoder

Do make sure you use really strong, unpredictable passphrases (30+ characters)!

http:brainwallet.org can be used to check the accuracy of this calculator.

function brainwallet_checksum () { (o='openssl sha256 -binary'; p='printf';($p %b "\x80";$p %s "$1"|$o)|$o|sha256sum|cut -b1-8); }
3

A bitcoin "brainwallet" is a secret passphrase you carry in your brain.

The Bitcoin Brainwallet Exponent Calculator is the second of three functions needed to calculate a bitcoin PRIVATE key. Roughly, checksum is the first 8 hex digits of sha256(sha256(0x80+sha256(passphrase)))

Note that this is a bash function, which means you have to type its name to invoke it

function brainwallet_exponent () { printf %s "$1"|sha256sum|head -c 64; }
2014-02-18 01:49:09
User: nixnax
Functions: head printf
3

A bitcoin "brainwallet" is a secret passphrase you carry in your brain.

The Bitcoin Brainwallet Exponent Calculator is one of three functions needed to calculate the bitcoin PRIVATE key. Roughly, the formula is exponent = sha256 (passphrase)

Note that this is a bash function, which means you have to type its name to invoke it.

You can check the accuracy of the results here http://brainwallet.org

c=$(pgrep <cmd>) && <new_cmd> && kill $c
2011-09-14 19:58:30
User: totti
Functions: kill
1

eg:

Already running cmd

sleep 120

Substitution cmd

c=$(pgrep sleep) && sleep 5 && kill $c
read -a A<<<".*.**..*....*** 8 9 5 10 6 0 2 11 7 4";for C in `date +"%H%M"|fold -w1`;do echo "${A:${A[C+1]}:4}";done
2010-12-02 22:04:49
User: __
Functions: echo fold read
4

Like 7171, but fixed typo, uses fewer variables, and even more cryptic!

read -a A <<<"8 9 5 10 6 0 3 11 7 4";B='.*.**..*....***';for C in $(date +"%H%M"|fold -w1);do echo "${B:${A[C]}:4}";done
cut -f 1 three-column.txt > first-column.txt
2010-07-11 10:13:45
User: postrational
Functions: cut
4

There is a common command for outputting a field or list of fields from each line in a file. Why wouldn't you just use cut?

awk '{print $1}' < three-column.txt > first-column.txt
while read col1 col23; do echo $col1; done < three-column.txt > first-column.txt
while read l; do echo ${l%% *}; done < three-column-list.txt > only-first-column.txt
2010-07-09 03:42:56
User: zed
Functions: echo read
1

The above is an example of grabbing only the first column. You can define the start and end points specifically by chacater position using the following command:

while read l; do echo ${l:10:40}; done < three-column-list.txt > column-c10-c40.txt

Of course, it doesn't have to be a column, or extraction, it can be replacement

while read l; do echo ${l/foo/bar}; done < list-with-foo.txt > list-with-bar.txt

Read more about parameter expansion here:

http://wiki.bash-hackers.org/syntax/pe

Think of this as an alternative to awk or sed for file operations

for f in t1.bmp t2.jpg t3.tga; do echo ${f%.*}.png; done
2010-07-09 00:38:53
User: zed
Functions: echo
7

The above is just a prove of concept based around the nested bash substitution. This could be useful in situations where you're in a directory with many filetypes but you only want to convert a few.

for f in *.bmp *.jpg *.tga; do convert $f ${f%.*}.png; done

or you can use ls | egrep to get more specific... but be warned, files with spaces will cause a ruckus with expansion but the bash for loop uses a space delimited list.

for f in $(ls | egrep "bmp$|jpg$|tga$"); do convert $f ${f%.*}.png; done

I'm guessing some people will still prefer doing it the sed way but I thought the concept of this one was pretty neat. It will help me remember bash substitutions a little better :-P

alias dateh='date --help|sed -n "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/p"|while read l;do F=${l/% */}; date +%$F:"|'"'"'${F//%n/ }'"'"'|${l#* }";done|sed "s/\ *|\ */|/g" |column -s "|" -t'
21

If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command.

# creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com

ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date +git-$USER@$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C 'webmaster@askapache.com' # /home/gpl/.ssh/git-gplnet@askapache.github.com-04-22-10

# create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory

tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g' <<< $PWD`.tgz) . # tar -czf /home/gpl/.backups/04-22-10-01:13-#home#gpl#.rr#src.tgz .

I personally find myself having to reference

date --help

quite a bit as a result. So this nice alias saves me a lot of time. This is one bdash mofo. Works in sh and bash (posix), but will likely need to be changed for other shells due to the parameter substitution going on.. Just extend the sed command, I prefer sed to pretty much everything anyways.. but it's always preferable to put in the extra effort to go for as much builtin use as you can. Otherwise it's not a top one-liner, it's a lazyboy recliner.

Here's the old version:

alias dateh='date --help|sed "/^ *%%/,/^ *%Z/!d;s/ \+/ /g"|while read l;do date "+ %${l/% */}_${l/% */}_${l#* }";done|column -s_ -t'

This trick from my [ http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html bash_profile ]

perl -lne 'print for /url":"\K[^"]+/g' $(ls -t ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/sessionstore.js | sed q)
2009-12-14 00:51:54
User: sputnick
Functions: ls perl sed
0

If you want all the URLs from all the sessions, you can use :

perl -lne 'print for /url":"\K[^"]+/g' ~/.mozilla/firefox/*/sessionstore.js

Thanks to tybalt89 ( idea of the "for" statement ).

For perl purists, there's JSON and File::Slurp modules, buts that's not installed by default.

sed -e "$ ! s/$/,/"
2009-10-13 10:13:52
User: jgc
Functions: sed
4

In this simple example the command will add a comma to the end of every line except the last. I found this really useful when programatically constructing sql scripts. See sample output for example.

echo "vertical text" | fold -1
echo "vertical text" | grep -o '.'
2009-09-11 03:45:04
User: dennisw
Functions: echo grep
11

Define a function

vert () { echo $1 | grep -o '.'; }

Use it to print some column headers

paste <(vert several) <(vert parallel) <(vert vertical) <(vert "lines of") <(vert "text can") <(vert "be used") <(vert "for labels") <(vert "for columns") <(vert "of numbers")