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Commands tagged print from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged print - 18 results
echo "select a, b, c from table where a = 3;"| python -c "import sys;import sqlparse;print sqlparse.format(sys.stdin.read(), reindent=True, keyword_case='upper')"
2014-02-21 23:17:15
User: hide1713
Functions: echo python
0

You need to apt-get install python-sqlparse. This command simply formats a sql query and prints it out. It is very useful when you want to move a sql query from commandline to a shell script. Everything is done locally, so you don't need to worry about copying sql query to external websites.

color () { local color=39; local bold=0; case $1 in green) color=32;; cyan) color=36;; blue) color=34;; gray) color=37;; darkgrey) color=30;; red) color=31;; esac; if [[ "$2" == "bold" ]]; then bold=1; fi; echo -en "\033[${bold};${color}m"; }
printTextInColorRed () { echo -e '\033[01;31m\033[K'"$@"'\033[m\033[K' ;} ## print text/string in color red
2013-08-28 10:06:59
User: totti
Functions: echo
1

eg:

printTextInColorRed foo bar

foo bar [in red color]

tcpdump -ntr NAME_OF_CAPTURED_FILE.pcap 'tcp[13] = 0x02 and dst port 80' | awk '{print $4}' | tr . ' ' | awk '{print $1"."$2"."$3"."$4}' | sort | uniq -c | awk ' {print $2 "\t" $1 }'
man -t ls > ls.ps && pdf2ps ls.ps && rm ls.ps
print "$(lsvg -Lo |xargs lsvg -L|grep "TOTAL PPs"|awk -F"(" '{print$2}'|sed -e "s/)//g" -e "s/megabytes/+/g"|xargs|sed -e "s/^/(/g" -e "s/+$/)\/1000/g"|bc ) GB"
2012-02-03 13:58:41
0

Not figured by me, but a colleague of mine.

See the total amount of data on an AIX machine.

ps -fea | grep PATTERN | awk {'print $2'} | xargs kill -9
tail -n +<N> <file> | head -n 1
2011-09-30 08:30:30
User: qweqq
Functions: head tail
-5

Tail is much faster than sed, awk because it doesn't check for regular expressions.

awk '$3==$4' /etc/passwd
hexdump -c <file>
VAR="foo" ; awk '{ print '"$VAR"' }'
2011-04-15 07:56:20
User: FRUiT
Functions: awk
Tags: bash awk print
-2

BASH: Print shell variable into AWK

MyVAR=86; awk -v n=$MyVAR '{print n}'
MyVAR=85 awk '{ print ENVIRON["MyVAR"] }'
2011-04-14 16:46:23
User: depesz
Functions: awk
Tags: bash awk print
3

Alternatively:

export MyVAR=84; awk '{ print ENVIRON["MyVAR"] }'

MyVAR=84; awk '{ print "'"$MyVAR"'" }'
for _a in {A..Z} {a..z};do _z=\${!${_a}*};for _i in `eval echo "${_z}"`;do echo -e "$_i: ${!_i}";done;done|cat -Tsv
2

This uses some tricks I found while reading the bash man page to enumerate and display all the current environment variables, including those not listed by the 'env' command which according to the bash docs are more for internal use by BASH. The main trick is the way bash will list all environment variable names when performing expansion on ${!A*}. Then the eval builtin makes it work in a loop.

I created a function for this and use it instead of env. (by aliasing env).

This is the function that given any parameters lists the variables that start with it. So 'aae B' would list all env variables starting wit B. And 'aae {A..Z} {a..z}' would list all variables starting with any letter of the alphabet. And 'aae TERM' would list all variables starting with TERM.

aae(){ local __a __i __z;for __a in "$@";do __z=\${!${__a}*};for __i in `eval echo "${__z}"`;do echo -e "$__i: ${!__i}";done;done; }

And my printenv replacement is:

alias env='aae {A..Z} {a..z} "_"|sort|cat -v 2>&1 | sed "s/\\^\\[/\\\\033/g"'

From: http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

convert -density 300 input.pdf -fill "rgb(255,255,255)" -opaque "rgb(0,0,0)" output.pdf
2010-10-07 17:24:19
User: akrog
Tags: pdf print convert
2

The pdf is first converted to a bitmap, so change "-density" to match your printer resolution. Also be careful about the RAM required.

In this example rgb(0,0,0) is replaced by rgb(255,255,255), change to suit your needs.

ifconfig | awk '/HW/ {print $5}'
2009-11-05 18:00:50
User: Cont3mpo
Functions: awk ifconfig
0

Simple MAC adrress, thanks to ifconfig.

find . -name 'junkfiles-*' -print0 | xargs -0 rm
2009-03-26 15:38:42
User: kancer
Functions: find xargs
Tags: find xargs print rm
1

Can be used for other commands as well, replace rm with ls.

It is easy to make this shorter but if the filenames involved have spaces, you will need to do use find's "-print0" option in conjunction with xargs's "-0" option. Otherwise the shell that xargs uses to execute the "rm" command line will treat the space as a token separator, thereby treating the name as two (or more) names.