What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you've been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

If you have a new feature suggestion or find a bug, please get in touch via http://commandlinefu.uservoice.com/

Get involved!

You can sign-in using OpenID credentials, or register a traditional username and password.

First-time OpenID users will be automatically assigned a username which can be changed after signing in.

Universal configuration monitoring and system of record for IT.

Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for:



May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!

Top Tags





Commands tagged du from sorted by
Terminal - Commands tagged du - 56 results
du -x --max-depth=1|sort -rn|awk -F / -v c=$COLUMNS 'NR==1{t=$1} NR>1{r=int($1/t*c+.5); b="\033[1;31m"; for (i=0; i<r; i++) b=b"#"; printf " %5.2f%% %s\033[0m %s\n", $1/t*100, b, $2}'|tac
2015-09-12 10:36:49
Functions: awk du printf sort

A more efficient way, with reversed order to put the focus in the big ones.

du -hs .[^.]* * | sort -h
2015-05-10 12:19:29
User: liminal
Functions: du sort
Tags: du usage disk

Same result as with 'du -ks .[^.]* * | sort -n' but with size outputs in human readable format (e.g., 1K 234M 2G)

du -ks .[^.]* * | sort -n
2015-05-08 12:26:34
User: rdc
Functions: du sort
Tags: du usage disk

This command summarizes the disk usage across the files and folders in a given directory, including hidden files and folders beginning with ".", but excluding the directories "." and ".."

It produces a sorted list with the largest files and folders at the bottom of the list

du -hs * |egrep -i "^(\s?\d+\.?\d+G)"
2014-12-09 15:23:21
User: krizzo
Functions: du egrep
Tags: size sort du

This will list all the files that are a gigabyte or larger in the current working directory. Change the G in the regex to be a M and you'll find all files that are a megabyte up to but not including a gigabyte.

du -hs *
du -g | perl -ne 'print if (tr#/#/# == <maximum depth>)'
2014-02-15 07:33:36
User: RAKK
Functions: du perl
Tags: perl du unix aix

Lists directory size up to a maximum traversal depth on systems like IBM AIX, where the du command doesn't have Linux's --max-depth option. AIX's du uses -g to display directory size on gigabytes, -m to use megabytes, and -k to use kilobytes. tr### is a Perl function that replaces characters and returns the amount of changed characters, so in this case it will return how many slashes there were in the full path name.

du -Lsbc * |awk 'function hr(bytes){hum[1024**4]="TiB";hum[1024**3]="GiB";hum[1024**2]="MiB";hum[1024]="kiB";for(x=1024**4;x>=1024;x/=1024){if(bytes>=x){return sprintf("%8.3f %s",bytes/x,hum[x]);}}return sprintf("%4d B",bytes);}{print hr($1) "\t" $2}'
find . -type d -print0 | xargs -0 du -s | sort -n | tail -10 | cut -f2 | xargs -I{} du -sh {} | sort -rn
du -mx [directory] | grep -P '^\d{4}' | sort -rn
2013-05-24 09:52:41
User: mc0e
Functions: du grep sort
Tags: bash Linux du

I don't like doing a massive sort on all the directory names just to get a small set of them. the above shows a sorted list of all directories over 1GB. use head as well if you want.

du's "-x" flag limits this to one file system. That's mostly useful when you run it on "/" but don't want "/proc" and "/dev" and so forth. Remember though that it will also exclude "/home" or "/var" if those are separate partitions.

the "-a" option is often useful too, for listing large files as well as large directories. Might be slower.

du -xB M --max-depth=2 /var | sort -rn | head -n 15
largest() { dir=${1:-"./"}; count=${2:-"10"}; echo "Getting top $count largest files in $dir"; du -sx "$dir/"* | sort -nk 1 | tail -n $count | cut -f2 | xargs -I file du -shx file; }
2013-01-21 09:45:21
User: jhyland87
Functions: cut du echo file sort tail xargs

You can simply run "largest", and list the top 10 files/directories in ./, or you can pass two parameters, the first being the directory, the 2nd being the limit of files to display.

Best off putting this in your bashrc or bash_profile file

du -hd1 |sort -h
du -sm /home/* | sort -n | tail -10
echo $(find <directory> -name '*.<extension>' -exec du -s {} \; | tee $(tty) | cut -f1 | tr '\n' '+') 0 | bc
2012-09-17 22:46:50
User: ysangkok
Functions: cut du echo find tee tr

Also shows files as they are found. Only works from a tty.

sudo -s du -sm /Users/* | sort -nr | head -n 10
2012-09-13 10:15:23
User: mematron
Functions: du head sort sudo

In OSX you would have to make sure that you "sudo -s" your way to happiness since it will give a few "Permission denied" errors before finally spitting out the results. In OSX the directory structure has to start with the "Users" Directory then it will recursively perform the operation.

Your Lord and master,


du -sh /home/*|sort -rh|head -n 10
2012-09-12 11:54:06
User: toaster
Functions: du head sort

the -h option of du and sort (on appropriate distrib) makes output "Human" readable and still sorted by "reversed size" (sort -rh)

du -sm /home/* | sort -nr | head -n 10
for i in G M K; do du -hx /var/ | grep [0-9]$i | sort -nr -k 1; done | less
2012-06-26 22:57:17
User: jlaunay
Functions: du grep sort
Tags: du

This command give a human readable result without messing up the sorting.

du -x / | sort -rn | less
2012-06-26 15:29:26
User: harpo
Functions: du sort
Tags: du

I had the problem that our monitoring showed that the "/" filesystem is >90% full. This command helped me to find out fast which subdirs are the biggest. The system has many NFS-mounts therefore the -x.

find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 du -h | sort -hr | head -20
2012-03-30 10:21:12
User: flatcap
Functions: du find head sort xargs

Search for files and list the 20 largest.

find . -type f

gives us a list of file, recursively, starting from here (.)

-print0 | xargs -0 du -h

separate the names of files with NULL characters, so we're not confused by spaces

then xargs run the du command to find their size (in human-readable form -- 64M not 64123456)

| sort -hr

use sort to arrange the list in size order. sort -h knows that 1M is bigger than 9K

| head -20

finally only select the top twenty out of the list

du -s $(ls -l | grep '^d' | awk '{print $9}') | sort -nr
du -sch *
2011-12-06 18:38:20
User: anarcat
Functions: du
Tags: space du disk

All folders, human-readable, no subfolder, with a total. Even shorter.

du -sh * | sort -rh | head
2011-11-16 06:01:02
User: sirex
Functions: du sort
Tags: du

This command simply outputs 10 files in human readable, that takes most space on your disk in current directory.

du -h --max-depth=1 |sort -rh
2011-11-15 20:30:00
User: jambino
Functions: du sort

In this case I'm just grabbing the next level of subdirectories (and same level regular files) with the --max-depth=1 flag. leaving out that flag will just give you finer resolution. Note that you have to use the -h switch with both 'du' and with 'sort.'

du -h | sort -hr