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May 19, 2015 - A Look At The New Commandlinefu
I've put together a short writeup on what kind of newness you can expect from the next iteration of clfu. Check it out here.
March 2, 2015 - New Management
I'm Jon, I'll be maintaining and improving clfu. Thanks to David for building such a great resource!

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Commands by sil from sorted by
Terminal - Commands by sil - 8 results
ruby -e "puts (1..20).map {rand(10 ** 10).to_s.rjust(10,'0')}"
2009-05-27 19:52:53
User: sil

There's been a few times I've needed to create random numbers. Although I've done so in PERL, I've found Ruby is actually faster. This script generates 20 random "10" digit number NOT A RANDOM NUMBER. Replace 20 (1..20) with the amount of random numbers you need generated

perl -lpe'1 while s/^([-+]?\d+)(\d{3})/$1.$2/'
perl -pe '$_=reverse;s/\d{3}(?=\d)(?!.*?\.)/$&,/g;$_=reverse'
2009-02-18 16:34:18
User: sil
Functions: perl

Insert a comma where necessary when counting large numbers. I needed to separate huge amounts of packets and after 12+ hours of looking in a terminal, I wanted it in readable form.

wget -qO - http://infiltrated.net/blacklisted|awk '!/#|[a-z]/&&/./{print "iptables -A INPUT -s "$1" -j DROP"}'
2009-02-18 16:08:23
User: sil
Functions: wget

Blacklisted is a compiled list of all known dirty hosts (botnets, spammers, bruteforcers, etc.) which is updated on an hourly basis. This command will get the list and create the rules for you, if you want them automatically blocked, append |sh to the end of the command line. It's a more practical solution to block all and allow in specifics however, there are many who don't or can't do this which is where this script will come in handy. For those using ipfw, a quick fix would be {print "add deny ip from "$1" to any}. Posted in the sample output are the top two entries. Be advised the blacklisted file itself filters out RFC1918 addresses (10.x.x.x, 172.16-31.x.x, 192.168.x.x) however, it is advisable you check/parse the list before you implement the rules

wget -qO - snubster.com|sed -n '65p'|awk 'gsub(/<span><br>.*/,"")&&1'|perl -p -e 's:myScroller1.addItem\("<span class=atHeaderOrange>::g;s:</span> <span class=snubFontSmall>::g;s:&quot;:":g;s:^:\n:g;s:$:\n:'
2009-02-18 15:05:13
User: sil
Functions: wget

I've got this posted in one of my .bash_profiles for humor whenever I log in.

sed 's/\(..\)/\1:/g;s/:$//' mac_address_list
2009-02-18 14:38:37
User: sil
Functions: sed

I sometimes have large files of MAC addresses stored in a file, some databases need the information stored with the semicolon (makes for easier programming a device) others don't. I have a barcode to text file scanner which usually butchers MAC addresses so this was the fix> I initially did this in awk ;)

awk '{for(i=10;i>=2;i-=2)$0=substr($0,1,i)":"substr($0,i+1);print}' mac_address_list

ps -C thisdaemon || { thisdaemon & }
2009-02-18 14:12:17
User: sil
Functions: ps

This comes in handy if you have daemons/programs that have potential issues and stop/disappear, etc., can be run in cron to ensure that a program remains up no matter what. Be advised though, if a program did core out, you'd likely want to know why (gdb) so use with caution on production machines.