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Commands using arp from sorted by
Terminal - Commands using arp - 11 results
Blocking ip: arp -s ip_of_host 0, Unblocking ip: arp -d ip_blocked
2015-04-22 19:00:13
User: andregyn62
Functions: arp

When you block any hosts using this method, the hosts can't do anything in the network.

The block is applied on firewall or gateway of the network.

(prefix="10.59.21" && for i in `seq 254`; do (sleep 0.5 && ping -c1 -w1 $prefix.$i &> /dev/null && arp -n | awk ' /'$prefix'.'$i' / { print $1 " " $3 } ') & done; wait)
2014-04-02 11:20:57
User: smoky
Functions: arp awk ping sleep
Tags: ping

Waits for all pings to complete and returns ip with mac address

arp -i <interface>
sudo ettercap -T -Q -M arp -i wlan0 // //
arp-scan -I eth0 -l | perl -ne '/((\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3})/ and $ip=$1 and $_=`nmblookup -A $ip` and /([[:alnum:]-]+)\s+<00>[^<]+<ACTIVE>/m and printf "%15s %s\n",$ip,$1'
arp-scan -l -g -interface (nic)
2011-01-13 20:29:37
User: pebkac
Functions: arp

This command will scan the subnet and exlude duplicates

for arptable in `arp | grep "eth1" | cut -d " " -f1`; do arp -d $arptable; done
2010-12-14 13:47:47
User: jaimerosario
Functions: arp cut grep

Clears the "arp" table, without entering manually addresses (tested in Ubuntu).

nmap -sP; arp -n | grep "192.168.1.[0-9]* *ether"
2010-04-12 14:36:15
User: gavinmc
Functions: arp grep

You send a unicast ICMP packet to each host. Many firewalls will drop that ICMP. However, in order to send the ICMP, you'll have first done an ARP request and the remote machine is unlikely to ignore that, so the computer will be in your ARP table.

sudo arp -s 00:35:cf:56:b2:2g temp && ssh root@
2009-09-11 07:49:28
User: svg
Functions: arp ssh sudo

Instead of looking for the right ip address, just pick whatever address you like and set a static ip mapping.

ssh root@`for ((i=100; i<=110; i++));do arp -a 192.168.1.$i; done | grep 00:35:cf:56:b2:2g | awk '{print $2}' | sed -e 's/(//' -e 's/)//'`
2009-09-09 04:32:20
User: gean01
Functions: arp awk grep sed ssh

Connect to a machine running ssh using mac address by using the "arp" command

arp -s $(route -n | awk '/^ {print $2}') \ $(arp -n | grep `route -n | awk '/^ {print $2}'`| awk '{print $3}')