Commands by KevinM (2)

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Quick and dirty RSS
runs an rss feed through sed replacing the closing tags with newlines and the opening tags with white space making it readable.

Delete all but the latest 5 files
yes 6 (tail from 6th line)

extracts 64 bytes of random digits from random lines out of /dev/random sent to stdio
Use this the next time you need to come up with a reasonably random bitstring, like for a WPA/WPA2 PSK or something. Takes a continuous stream of bytes coming from /dev/urandom, runs it through od(1), picking a random field ($0 and $1 excluded) from a random line and then prints it.

history autocompletion with arrow keys
This will enable the possibility to navigate in the history of the command you type with the arrow keys, example "na" and the arrow will give all command starting by na in the history.You can add these lines to your .bashrc (without &&) to use that in your default terminal.

Look for English words in /dev/urandom
* to get the English dictionary: wget http://www.mavi1.org/web_security/wordlists/webster-dictionary.txt

a function to put environment variable in zsh history for editing
This only makes sense if you are using command line editing. Create the function in your current zsh session, then type eve PATH go 'UP' in your history and notice the current (editable) definition of PATH shows up as the previous command. Same as doing: PATH="'$PATH'" but takes fewer characters and you don't have to remember the escaping.

list with full path

Multiple variable assignments from command output in BASH
No command substitution but subshell redirection

List the CPU model name
Information for only one core.

Get table column names from an MySQL-database in comma-seperated form


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