Commands by PhilHudson (1)

  • Refactored the original. Cuts out the unnecessary grep and echo. Sample output shows that you get multiple results if you have multiple displays, each presented as 'landscape' whether the display is in fact in landscape or portrait orientation. In the sample case, 1920x1200 is misleading, since it's really in portrait mode, 1200x1920. Show Sample Output


    0
    xrandr | sed -n '/\*/ s/\s*\([0-9x]*\).*/\1/ p'
    PhilHudson · 2014-11-19 15:04:09 0

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