Commands by Raymii (2)

  • First set the variable $hexchars: hexchars="0123456789ABCDEF" Change the number in the first for loop if you need less then 1200 mac addresses Show Sample Output


    2
    for i in {0..1200}; do for i in {1..12} ; do echo -n ${hexchars:$(( $RANDOM % 16 )):1} ; done | sed -e 's/\(..\)/:\1/g' | sed 's/.\(.*\)/\1/' ; echo; done
    Raymii · 2010-12-04 16:44:11 0
  • Full Command: google contacts list name,name,email|perl -pne 's%^((?!N\/A)(.+?)),((?!N\/A)(.+?)),([a-z0-9\._-]+\@([a-z0-9][a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]\.)+([a-z]+\.)?([a-z]+))%${1}:${3} <${5}>%imx'|grep -oP '^((?!N\/A)(.+?)) <[a-z0-9\._-]+\@([a-z0-9][a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]\.)+([a-z]+\.)?([a-z]+)>' | sort You'll need googlecl and python-gdata. First setup google cl via: google Then give your PC access google contacts list name,email Then do the command, save it or use this one to dump it in the cone-address.txt file in your home dir: google contacts list name,name,email | perl -p -n -e 's%^((?!N\/A)(.+?)),((?!N\/A)(.+?)),([a-z0-9\._-]+\@([a-z0-9][a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]\.)+([a-z]+\.)?([a-z]+))%${1}:${3} <${5}>%imx' | grep -o -P '^((?!N\/A)(.+?)) <[a-z0-9\._-]+\@([a-z0-9][a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]\.)+([a-z]+\.)?([a-z]+)>' | sort > ~/cone-adress.txt Then import into cone. It filters out multiple emails, and contacts with no email that have N/A. (Picasa photo persons without email for example...) Show Sample Output


    1
    google contacts list name,name,email|perl -pne 's%^((?!N\/A)(.+?)),((?!N\/A)(.+?)),([a-z0-9\._-]+\@([a-z0-9][a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]\.)+([a-z]+\.)?([a-z]+))%${1}:${3} <${5}>%imx' #see below for full command
    Raymii · 2010-07-12 16:50:44 3

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