Commands by chintohere (3)

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Get a list of the erroring cifs entries in fstab
It disturbs me when my logwatch report tells me a share or machine has disappeared, esp as mount isn't telling me what's gone. This command outputs to stderr the erroring cifs entries from fstab.

Identify all amazon cloudformation scripts recursively using ripgrep
This assumes you are in the cwd of where you put your s3 scripts. Its useful if someone decides to create aws cloudformation scripts and doesn't add the 'yaml' or .yml extension.

display the hover text of the most recent xkcd
I look at xkcd in my news reader, but it displays the image's title attribute only for a few seconds which makes reading the longer ones more challenging. So I use this to display it in my console.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

monitor a tail -f command with multiple processes
when using named pipes only one reader is given the output by default. Also, most commands piped to by grep use a buffer which save output until tail -f finishes, which is not convenient. Here, using a combination of tee, sub-processes and the --line-buffered switch in grep we can workaround the problem.

Unpack .tgz File On Linux
With -a you don't care about file type (bz2, gzip, etc.)

Route outbound SMTP connections through a addtional IP address rather than your primary

Remove spaces from filenames - through a whole directory tree.
Sometimes, you don't want to just replace the spaces in the current folder, but through the whole folder tree - such as your whole music collection, perhaps. Or maybe you want to do some other renaming operation throughout a tree - this command's useful for that, too. To rename stuff through a whole directory tree, you might expect this to work: for a in `find . -name '* *'`;do mv -i "$a" ${a// /_};done No such luck. The "for" command will split its parameters on spaces unless the spaces are escaped, so given a file "foo bar", the above would not try to move the file "foo bar" to "foo_bar" but rather the file "foo" to "foo", and the file "bar" to "bar". Instead, find's -execdir and -depth arguments need to be used, to set a variable to the filename, and rename files within the directory before we rename the directory. It has to be -execdir and won't work with just -exec - that would try to rename "foo bar/baz quux" to "foo_bar/baz_quux" in one step, rather than going into "foo bar/", changing "baz quux" to "baz_quux", then stepping out and changing "foo bar/" into "foo_bar/". To rename just files, or just directories, you can put "-type f" or "-type d" after the "-depth" param. You could probably safely replace the "mv" part of the line with a "rename" command, like rename 'y/ /_/' *, but I haven't tried, since that's way less portable.

Create A Continuous Yahoo! News Ticker For The Terminal
This creates a permanent stock ticker in the terminal. it has scrolling action and refreshes when each cycle is done to get the latest news.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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