Commands by clockworkavian (4)

  • This will perform one of two blocks of code, depending on the condition of the first. Essentially is a bash terniary operator. To tell if a machine is up: ping -c1 machine { echo succes;} || { echo failed; } Because of the bash { } block operators, you can have multiple commands ping -c1 machine && { echo success;log-timestamp.sh }|| { echo failed; email-admin.sh; } Tips: Remember, the { } operators are treated by bash as a reserved word: as such, they need a space on either side. If you have a command that can fail at the end of the true block, consider ending said block with 'false' to prevent accidental execution Show Sample Output


    23
    true && { echo success;} || { echo failed; }
    clockworkavian · 2009-04-02 01:49:25 1
  • Not so much handy by itself, but very nice in shell scripts. This makes you a handy ncurses based checklist. Much like terminal installers, just use the arrow keys and hit 'Space' to adjust the selections. Returns all selected tags as strings, with no newline at the end. So, your output will be something like: "one" "two" "three" "four" "etc" For those who prefer bash expansion over gratuitious typing: whiptail --checklist "Simple checkbox menu" 12 35 3 $(echo {one,two,three,four}" '' 0"} ) Things to note: The height must includes the outer border and padding: add 7 to however many items you want to show up at the same time. If the status is 1, it will be selected by default. anything else, will be deselected. Show Sample Output


    6
    whiptail --checklist "Simple checkbox menu" 11 35 5 tag item status repeat tags 1
    clockworkavian · 2009-03-30 12:21:48 2
  • This function runs a program in the background, and logs all output to an automatically created logfile. That way, you can still get at the output without it clogging up your terminal. Tip: Throw fork() and this: for prog in firefox kate konqueror ;do alias $prog="fork $prog";done into your bashrc, so that they'll automatically run out of the way. Show Sample Output


    1
    function fork () { tf=$(tempfile -d /tmp -p $1.);echo -n "$tf "; $@ &>$tf& }
    clockworkavian · 2009-03-25 23:33:54 2
  • Depending on the network setup, you may not get the hostname. Show Sample Output


    4
    nmap 192.168.0-1.0-255 -sP
    clockworkavian · 2009-03-23 22:19:05 4

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Find unused IPs on a given subnet
Somewhat shorter version.

Quickly generate an MD5 hash for a text string using OpenSSL
Here Strings / A variant of here documents, the format is:

Redirect STDIN
Several times, I find myself hitting my up arrow, and changing the search term. Unfortunately, I find myself wasting too much time typing: $ grep kernel /var/log/messages Redirecting STDIN allows me to put the search term at the end so I less cursor movement to change what I'm searching for: $ < /var/log/messages grep kernel If you're using the emacs keyboard binding, then after you press your up arrow, press CTRL+w to erase the word. If this has already been submitted, I couldn't find it with the search utility.

Convert multiple flac files to mp3
make sure that flac and lame are installed sudo apt-get install lame flac

Randomize lines in a file
Works in sort (GNU coreutils) 7.4, don't know when it was implemented but sometime the last 6 years.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Forwards connections to your port 2000 to the port 22 of a remote host via ssh tunnel

Wich program is listen on port OSX

Both view and pipe the file without saving to disk
This is a cool trick to view the contents of the file on /dev/pts/0 (or whatever terminal you're using), and also send the contents of that file to another program by way of an unnamed pipe. All the while, you've not bothered saving any extra data to disk, like you might be tempted to do with sed or grep to filter output.


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