Commands by deinerson1 (1)

  • Compactly display a bitcoin-cli fee estimate in satoshis/Byte, sat/B, date time stamp. Change the 6 to the desired number of confirmations. Display in btc/KB unit of measure: printf %g "$(bccli estimatesmartfee 6 "ECONOMICAL" | jq .feerate)";printf " btc/KB estimated feerate for 6 confirmations\nMultiply by 100,000 to get sat/B\n"; Two settings for estimate mode are "ECONOMICAL". "CONSERVATIVE" is the same as "UNSET" # jq is a json filter. sudo apt-get install jq Show Sample Output


    0
    printf %g "$(bitcoin-cli estimatesmartfee 6 "ECONOMICAL" | jq .feerate*100000)";printf " sat/B estimated feerate for 6 confirmations as of $(date +%c)\nDivide by 100,000 to get btc/KB\n"
    deinerson1 · 2018-06-20 13:40:32 0

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