Commands by dfinf2 (1)

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Split a large file, without wasting disk space
It's common to want to split up large files and the usual method is to use split(1). If you have a 10GiB file, you'll need 10GiB of free space. Then the OS has to read 10GiB and write 10GiB (usually on the same filesystem). This takes AGES. . The command uses a set of loop block devices to create fake chunks, but without making any changes to the file. This means the file splitting is nearly instantaneous. The example creates a 1GiB file, then splits it into 16 x 64MiB chunks (/dev/loop0 .. loop15). . Note: This isn't a drop-in replacement for using split. The results are block devices. tar and zip won't do what you expect when given block devices. . These commands will work: $ hexdump /dev/loop4 . $ gzip -9 < /dev/loop6 > part6.gz . $ cat /dev/loop10 > /media/usb/part10.bin

Salvage a borked terminal
If you bork your terminal by sending binary data to STDOUT or similar, you can get your terminal back using this command rather than killing and restarting the session. Note that you often won't be able to see the characters as you type them.

Encode a string using ROT47
This command will encode a string using the ROT47 cipher.

print DateTimeOriginal from EXIF data for all files in folder
see output from `identify -verbose` for other keywords to filter for (e.g. date:create, exif:DateTime, EXIF:ExifOffset).

Copy all shared libraries for a binary to directory
When working with jailed environments you need to copy all the shared libraries to your jail environment. This is done by running ldd on a binary which needs to run inside the jail. This command will use the output from ldd to automatically copy the shared libraries to a folder of your choice.

draw line separator
Even shorter: $ seq -s '*' 120|tr -d '[0-9]'

32 bits or 64 bits?

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

List your largest installed packages (on Debian/Ubuntu)

netstat with group by (ip adress)
Same as the rest, but handle IPv6 short IPs. Also, sort in the order that you're probably looking for.


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