Commands by digglife (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Find files and list them sorted by modification time
This uses the ability of find (at least the one from GNU findutils that is shiped with most linux distros) to display change time as part of its output. No xargs needed.

Ping sweep without NMAP
Ping sweep without NMAP

Read funny developer comments in the Linux source tree
These are way better than fortune(6).

Mnemonic for `nice` and `renice` command
This is just a phrase I use to help me remember which way is what when using nice (top, renice, etc.), and not a command, (unless you really want this in your .bash_history to help remind you.) I was using the command `man nice ` way too much just to look up which way is what. This saves 9 keystrokes every time I remember it. Make sure you downvote me if you think mnemonics sux. Otherwise I hope this helps someone else.

Make sudo forget password instantly
By default sudo 'remembers' password for a few minutes, so that you do not need to re-enter password for a series of sudo commands that might follow within a short time duration. However, sometime you might want sudo to instantly 'forget' the password. (Next sudo command will need you to reenter the password) Credit: I first learned this while listening to one of the 'tuxradar' podcast.

print a file on a single line
Example: you have a package.txt you want to install on a system. Instead of this: cat package.txt package1 package2 package3 You want it to cat out on one line so you can print "yum install package1 package2 package3"

Find top 10 largest files in /var directory (subdirectories and hidden files included )
Same as above, but modified to show human readable output

Get first Git commit hash
git log --format=%H | tail -1 doesn't work anymore

Rename all files in a directory to the md5 hash


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