Commands by f0rk (1)

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Show (only) list of files changed by commit
Lists ONLY the files changed by the given HASH/HEAD/list of hashes, etc. The message, commit ID, author, etc. is not included

Easy Persistent SSH Connections Using Screen
Use as: $ s host1 Will ssh to remote host upon first invocation. Then use C-a d to detatch. Running "s host1" again will resume the shell session on the remote host. Only useful in LAN environment. You'd want to start the screen on the remote host over a WAN. Adapted from Hack 34 in Linux Server Hacks 2nd Addition.

Resume a detached screen session, resizing to fit the current terminal
By default, screen tries to restore its old window sizes when attaching to resizable terminals. This command is the command-line equivalent to typing ^A F to fit an open screen session to the window.

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

watch your network load on specific network interface
-n means refresh frequency you could change eth0 to any interface you want, like wlan0

Function to output an ASCII character given its decimal equivalent
I've corrected the function. My octal conversion formula was completely wrong. Thanks to pgas at http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/071 for setting me straight. The new function is from pgas and is very fast.

Create an alias, store it in ~/.bash_aliases and source your new alias into the ~/.bashrc
This is useful if you use a shell with a lot of other users. You will be able to run "topu" to see your running processes instead of the complete 'top -u username'. Read more on alias: http://man.cx/alias

Rsync a directory excluding pesky .svn dirs

a for loop with filling 0 format, with seq
seq allows you to format the output thanks to the -f option. This is very useful if you want to rename your files to the same format in order to be able to easily sort for example: $for i in `seq 1 3 10`; do touch foo$i ;done And $ls foo* | sort -n foo1 foo10 foo4 foo7 But: $for i in `seq -f %02g 1 3 10`; do touch foo$i ;done So $ls foo* | sort -n foo01 foo04 foo07 foo10

cd into another dir to run a one-liner, but implicitly drop back to your $OLD_PWD after
Obviously the example given is necessarily simple, but this command not only saves time on the command line (saves you using "cd -" or, worse, having to type a fully qualified path if your command cd's more than once), but is vital in scripts, where I've found the behaviour of "cd -" to be a little broken at times.


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