Commands by gspadari (1)

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sum numbers in the file (or stdin)
add integers from the stdin and print out the result usually, cat /tmp/file | echo $(($(tr '\n' '+')0))

Erase a word

seconds since epoch to ISO timestamp
No need to use perl, awk, nor /usr/bin/date -- bash's "printf" builtin will do it.

List upgrade-able packages on Ubuntu
Taken from apticron and modified.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

function to compute what percentage of X is Y? Where percent/100 = X/Y => percent=100*X/Y
This function make it easy to compute X/Y as a percentage. The name "wpoxiy" is an acronym of "what percentage of X is Y"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Console clock
You will see it on the corner of your running terminal.

execute your commands hiding secret bits from history records
$ wget --user=username --password="$password" http://example.org/ Instead of hiding commands entirely from history, I prefer to use "read" to put the password into a variable, and then use that variable in the commands instead of the password. Without the "-e" and "-s" it should work in any bourne-type shell, but the -s is what makes sure the password doesn't get echoed to the screen at all. (-e makes editing work a bit better)

Convert PNG to GIF
(relies on 'imagemagick') Convert all .png files to .gif. This can also go the other way if you reverse the file extensions in the command, e.g.: $ for file in *.gif; do convert "$file" "$(basename $file .gif).png"; done If the file is named 'example1.png' it will be named 'example1.gif' when it is complete.


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