Commands by himynameisthor (1)

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commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

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find all file larger than 500M

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Monitor cpu freq and temperature
This is maybe helpfull from system overheat on your linux box

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

list services running (as root)
A quick way to list services running

grep lines containing two consecutive hyphens

parrallel execution of a command on remote hosts by ssh or rsh or ...
parrallel execution of a command on remote host by ssh or rsh or ... very useful for cluster management (software update)

Output a list of svn repository entities to xml file
I use this to pull the last commit date for everything in my repo, so I can tell the client which files haven't been touched or updated since the repo was created. Another way to do it is to use svn log, but that does not pull the "kind" attribute. It does, however, give you the commit message. Both are very useful.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Execute a command without saving it in the history
Yes, by correctly setting the HIST* variables you can make certain commands not saved in history. But that's complicated and easy to make a mistake. If you set HISTFILE= to blank, nothing in your current shell session will be saved in history. Although this is not a precise answer to the subject, but it's very simple.


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