Commands by introp (2)

  • Sometimes, in a shell script, you need a random number bigger than the range of $RANDOM. This will print a random number made of four hex values extracted from /dev/urandom. Show Sample Output


    1
    printf %d 0x`dd if=/dev/urandom bs=1 count=4 2>/dev/null | od -x | awk 'NR==1 {print $2$3}'`
    introp · 2009-02-18 16:23:09 1
  • I put this in a shell script called "svndiff", as it provides a handy decorated "svn diff" output that is colored (which you can't see here) and paged. The -r is required so less doesn't mangle the color codes. Show Sample Output


    2
    svn diff $* | colordiff | less -r
    introp · 2009-02-18 16:19:08 2

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