Commands by jamolkhon (2)

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Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Count the number of characters in each line

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

To print a specific line from a file
Just one character longer than the sed version ('FNR==5' versus -n 5p). On my system, without using "exit" or "q", the awk version is over four times faster on a ~900K file using the following timing comparison: $ testfile="testfile"; for cmd in "awk 'FNR==20'" "sed -n '20p'"; do echo; echo $cmd; eval "$cmd $testfile"; for i in {1..3}; do time for j in {1..100}; do eval "$cmd $testfile" >/dev/null; done; done; done Adding "exit" or "q" made the difference between awk and sed negligible and produced a four-fold improvement over the awk timing without the "exit". For long files, an exit can speed things up: $ awk 'FNR==5{print;exit}'

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Changing the terminal title to the last shell command
You can set the previous bash command as the terminal title by this command. Explanation: -trap assigns a command to execute at a given bash signal. -in the $BASH_COMMAND you find the last command -you can set the terminal title with the escape sequence: \e]0;this is the title\007 -to let the echo care about the backslashes give the -e to it Since trap is a built in bash command you find more informatin in 'man bash'for more Source: http://www.davidpashley.com/articles/xterm-titles-with-bash.html

tail: watch a filelog
-f file(s) to be monitorized -n number of last line to be printed on the screen in this example, the content of two files are displayed

Update zone file Serial numbers
Will edit *.db files in the same directory with todays date. Useful for doing a mass update to domains on a nameserver, adding spf records, etc. Looks for a string starting with 200 or 201 followed by 7 numbers, and replaces with todays date. This won't overwrite Ip's but i would still do some double checking after running this. Make sure your server's date is correct, otherwise insert your own serial number. $rndc reload should usually follow this command.

oneliner to transfer a directory using ssh and tar
this will tar/send/untrar a whole directory.

Easy to extend one-liner for cron scripts that automate filesystem checking
This one-liner is for cron jobs that need to provide some basic information about a filesystem and the time it takes to complete the operation. You can swap out the di command for df or du if that's your thing. The |& redirections the stderr and stdout to the mail command. How to configure the variables. TOFSCK=/path/to/mount FSCKDEV=/dev/path/device or FSCKDEV=`grep $TOFSCK /proc/mounts | cut -f1 -d" "` MAILSUB="weekly file system check $TOFSCK "


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