Commands by mogsie (2)

  • Puts a splash of color in your access logs. IP addresses are gray, 200 and 304 are green, all 4xx errors are red. Works well with e.g. "colorize access_log | less -R" if you want to see your colors while paging. Use as inspiration for other things you might be tailing, like syslog or vmstat Usage: tail -f access.log | colorize


    1
    function colorize() { c="--line-buffered --color=yes"; GREP_COLORS="mt=01;34" egrep $c '(^| 200 | 304 )' "${@}" | GREP_COLORS="mt=02;31" egrep $c '(^|"(GET|POST) .*[^0-9] 4[0-1][0-9] )' | GREP_COLORS="ms=02;37" egrep $c '(^|^[0-9\.]+) ';}
    mogsie · 2013-08-14 21:05:34 9
  • apt-get must be run as root, and it is useless to run it as your own user. So just run it as root. Saves you the "sudo !!" every time you're adding a package.


    -4
    alias apt-get='sudo apt-get'
    mogsie · 2009-02-10 22:45:49 16

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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
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Print process run time, average CPU usage, and maximum memory usage on exit
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Don't spam root. Log your cronjob output to syslog
This command will log the output of your simple cronjobs to syslog, and syslog will take it from there. Works great for monitoring scripts which only produce simple output. Advantages: * This can be used by regular users, without modifying system files like /etc/syslog.conf * Reduce cron spam to root@localhost (Please stop spaming the sysadmins) * Uses common tools like syslog (and logrotate) so that you don't need to maintain yet another krufty logfile. * Still ensures that the output is logged somewhere, for posterity. Perhaps it's stored the secure, central syslog server, for example. * Seems to work fine on Ubuntu, CentOS, FreeBSD & MacOSX

Show apps that use internet connection at the moment. (Multi-Language)
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extract all urls from firefox sessionstore
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Remove all but one specific file

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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