Commands by pooryorick (1)

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Turn white color to transparent for a series of png images
mogrify can be used like convert. The difference is that mogrify overwrites files: http://www.imagemagick.org/www/mogrify.html Of course, other source colors can be used as well.

Convert all files *.mp4 to *.mpeg using ffmpeg (Windows Cmd line)
Note: %~nI expands %I to a file name only (cf. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb490909.aspx)

RTFM function
RTFMFTW.

send incoming audio to a Icecast server (giss.tv)
easy way to setup an "internet radio sation", pre-requisite, create an account at an icecast server, in this example, just created beforehand an account at giss.tv. Change the word password, with the respective real password you created at server. Make sure to have installed rec, oggnec, oggfwd and tee. I have a mixer connected at line in, so I can mix music and microphone. This also will produce a local recorded copy of the session, it will be called "streamdump.ogg"

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Convert a SVG file to grayscale
It requires inkscape 0.46 and lxml packages

Get a range of SVN revisions from svn diff and tar gz them
Handy when you need to create a list of files to be updated when subversion is not available on the remote host. You can take this tar file, and upload and extract it where you need it. Replace M and N with the revisions specific to yours. Make sure you do this from an updated (svn up) working directory.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

computes the most frequent used words of a text file
using $ cat WAR_AND_PEACE_By_LeoTolstoi.txt | tr -cs "[:alnum:]" "\n"| tr "[:lower:]" "[:upper:]" | sort -S16M | uniq -c |sort -nr | cat -n | head -n 30 ("sort -S1G" - Linux/GNU sort only) will also do the job but as some drawbacks (caused by space/time complexity of sorting) for bigger files...

Get absolut path to your bash-script
Another way of doing it that's a bit clearer. I'm a fan of readable code.


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