Commands by sbisordi (1)

  • This is meant for the bash shell. Put this function in your .profile and you'll be able to use tab-completion for sshing any host which is in your known_hosts file. This assumes that your known_hosts file is located at ~/.ssh/known_hosts. The "complete" command should go on a separate line as such: function autoCompleteHostname() { local hosts=($(awk '{print $1}' ~/.ssh/known_hosts | cut -d, -f1)); local cur=${COMP_WORDS[COMP_CWORD]}; COMPREPLY=($(compgen -W '${hosts[@]}' -- $cur )) } complete -F autoCompleteHostname ssh


    6
    function autoCompleteHostname() { local hosts; local cur; hosts=($(awk '{print $1}' ~/.ssh/known_hosts | cut -d, -f1)); cur=${COMP_WORDS[COMP_CWORD]}; COMPREPLY=($(compgen -W '${hosts[@]}' -- $cur )) } complete -F autoCompleteHostname ssh
    sbisordi · 2009-05-17 23:12:34 3

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