Commands by servermanaged (56)

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Print a horizontal line
Replace the underscore with any other character. e.g. + or - or =

Show what PID is listening on port 80 on Linux

quickly formats a fat partition. usefull for flash drives

View a sopcast stream
Get sopcast links for live sports from http://myp2p.eu (for example) Get sp-sc or sp-auth binary by googling (sopcast + linux) eg http://www.jbg.f2s.com/sp-sc.gz Requires the 32bit libstdc++5 package. After exiting mplayer, type 'killall sp-sc'

prevent large files from being cached in memory (backups!)
We all know... $ nice -n19 for low CPU priority.   $ ionice -c3 for low I/O priority.   nocache can be useful in related scenarios, when we operate on very large files just a single time, e.g. a backup job. It advises the kernel that no caching is required for the involved files, so our current file cache is not erased, potentially decreasing performance on other, more typical file I/O, e.g. on a desktop.   http://askubuntu.com/questions/122857 https://github.com/Feh/nocache http://packages.debian.org/search?keywords=nocache http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=nocache   To undo caching of a single file in hindsight, you can do $ cachedel   To check the cache status of a file, do $ cachestats

convert from hexidecimal or octal to decimal
Bash can accept '0x' and '0' notation for hexidecimal and octal numbers, so you just have to output the values.

Instead of writing a multiline if/then/else/fi construct you can do that by one line
instead of writing: if [[ "$1" == "$2" ]]; then echo "$1 is equal $2" else echo "$1 differs from $2" fi do write: [[ "$1" == "$2" ]] && echo "$1 is equal $2" || echo "$1 differs from $2"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Remount an already-mounted filesystem without unmounting it
Necessary for fsck for example. The remount functionality follows the standard way how the mount command works with options from fstab. It means the mount command doesn't read fstab (or mtab) only when a device and dir are fully specified. After this call all old mount options are replaced and arbitrary stuff from fstab is ignored, except the loop= option which is internally generated and maintained by the mount command. It does not change device or mount point.

Remove executable bit from all files in the current directory recursively, excluding other directories
With GNU chmod at least it is that simple.


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