Commands by sitaramcUnused (2)

  • ( IFS=:; for i in $PATH; do echo $i; done; ) echo $PATH|sed -e 's/:/\n/g' # but the tr one is even better of course echo $PATH|xargs -d: -i echo {} # but this comes up with an extra blank line; can't figure out why and don't have the time :( echo $PATH|cut -d: --output-delimiter=' ' -f1-99 # note -- you have to hit ENTER after the first QUOTE, then type the second one. Sneaky, huh? echo $PATH | perl -l -0x3a -pe 1 # same darn extra new line; again no time to investigate echo $PATH|perl -pe 's/:/\n/g' # too obvious; clearly I'm running out of ideas :-)


    -17
    not necessarily better, but many...!
    sitaramcUnused · 2009-08-12 11:03:26 0
  • jhead is a very nice tool to do all sorts of things with photographs, in a batch-oriented way. It has a specific function to rename files based on dates, and the format I used above was just an example. Show Sample Output


    4
    jhead -n%Y%m%d-%H%M%S *.jpg
    sitaramcUnused · 2009-08-10 03:49:30 2

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