Commands by theoj (1)

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Sum file sizes

C one-liners
$ /lib/ld-linux.so.2 is the runtime linker/loader for ELF binaries on Linux. =(cmd) is a zsh trick to take the output for the command "inside" it and save it to a temporary file. $ echo -e 'blah' | gcc -x c -o /dev/stdout - pipes the C source to gcc. -x c tells gcc that it's compiling C (which is required if it's reading from a pipe). -o /dev/stdout - tells it to write the binary to standard output and read the source from standard input. because of the the =() thing, the compiled output is stashed in a tempfile, which the loader then runs and executes, and the shell tosses the tempfile away immediately after running it.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).

a simple bash one-liner to create php file and call php function

Show a config file without comments

Get the SUM of visual blocked digits in vim

Create a new file

reclaim your window titlebars (in ubuntu lucid)

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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