rsync -av -e "ssh -o MACs=hmac-ripemd160" --progress --partial user@remotehost://path/to/remote/stuff .

Transfer with rsync a file using SSH with a forced HMAC integrity algorithm

This command allows you to mirror folders or files with rsync using a secure SSH channel with a forced HMAC integrity algorithm. Use this if you are absolutely adamant about preserving data integrity while mirroring a set of files. --partial is for resumability.

0
By: RAKK
2014-02-01 00:46:38

These Might Interest You

  • a : to keep files permissions --no-whole file : use rsync?s delta-transfer algorithm --inplace : writes the updated data directly to the destination file optionnal -> add --remove-source-files to mv instead of cp


    0
    rsync -aP --no-whole-file --inplace
    jlaunay · 2012-01-29 18:39:31 0
  • Transfer files with rsync over ssh on a non-standard port, showing a progress bar and resuming partial transfers.


    -1
    rsync -P -e 'ssh -p PORT' SRC DEST
    vickio · 2011-10-13 08:59:07 1
  • Put it into your sh startup script (I use alias scpresume='rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh' in bash). When a file transfer via scp has aborted, just use scpresume instead of scp and rsync will copy only the parts of the file that haven't yet been transmitted. Show Sample Output


    14
    rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh SOURCE DESTINATION
    episodeiv · 2009-02-16 16:22:10 3
  • transfer files from localhost to a remotehost.


    7
    rsync -av --progress ./file.txt user@host:/path/to/dir
    aoiaoi · 2009-02-06 11:51:51 1
  • It can resume a failed secure copy ( usefull when you transfer big files like db dumps through vpn ) using rsync. It requires rsync installed in both hosts. rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh $file_source $user@$host:$destination_file local -> remote or rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh $user@$host:$remote_file $destination_file remote -> local


    23
    rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh $file_source $user@$host:$destination_file
    dr_gogeta86 · 2009-04-01 13:13:14 1
  • This is the THIRD in a set of five commands. See my other commands for the previous two. This step creates the oauth 1.0 token as explained in http://oauth.net/core/1.0/ The token is required for a Twitter filtered stream feed (and almost all Twitter API calls) This token is simply an encrypted version of your base string. The encryption key used is your hmac. The last part of the command scans the Base64 token string for '+', '/', and '=' characters and converts them to percentage-hex escape codes. (URI-escapeing). This is also a good example of where the $() syntax of Bash command substitution fails, while the backtick form ` works - the right parenthesis in the case statement causes a syntax error if you try to use the $() syntax here. See my previous two commands step1 and step2 to see how the base string variable $b and hmac variable $hmac are generated.


    10
    step3() { s=$(echo -n $b | openssl dgst -sha1 -hmac $hmac -binary | openssl base64); signature=`for((i=0;i<${#s};i++)); do case ${s:i:1} in +) e %2B;; /) e %2F;; =) e %3D;; *) e ${s:i:1};; esac ; done` ; } ; e() { echo -n $1; }
    nixnax · 2012-03-11 10:44:01 0

What do you think?

Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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