sh <(curl hashbang.sh)

Get a free shell account on a community server

Bash process substitution which curls the website 'hashbang.sh' and executes the shell script embedded in the page. This is obviously not the most secure way to run something like this, and we will scold you if you try. The smarter way would be: Download locally over SSL > curl https://hashbang.sh >> hashbang.sh Verify integrty with GPG (If available) > gpg --recv-keys 0xD2C4C74D8FAA96F5 > gpg --verify hashbang.sh Inspect source code > less hashbang.sh Run > chmod +x hashbang.sh > ./hashbang.sh

5
By: lrvick
2015-03-15 21:02:01

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What Others Think

A great project that we will grow around the hashbang #! community. Stay tuned!
Blacksimon · 166 weeks and 2 days ago
This project does not work.
Tiosam · 165 weeks and 6 days ago

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Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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