print/scan lines starting at record ###

tail +### MYFILE
Useful for finding newly added lines to a file, tail + can be used to show only the lines starting at some offset. A syslog scanner would look at the file for the first time, then record the end_of_file record number using wc -l. Later (hours, days), scan only at the lines that were added since the last scan.
Sample Output
MYFILE=/var/log/messages
EOF=$(wc -l < $MYFILE)

...time passes...
tail +$($EOF+1) $MYFILE

1
2015-04-23 11:49:15

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