Commands by pooderbill (4)

  • Useful for finding newly added lines to a file, tail + can be used to show only the lines starting at some offset. A syslog scanner would look at the file for the first time, then record the end_of_file record number using wc -l. Later (hours, days), scan only at the lines that were added since the last scan. Show Sample Output


    1
    tail +### MYFILE
    pooderbill · 2015-04-23 11:49:15 0
  • view is the command: vi -r which opens a file in read-only mode. The + character jumps to the bottom of the logfile where the most relevant information starts. Other aliases can be created for commonly viewed logfiles. Show Sample Output


    -1
    view + LOGFILE
    pooderbill · 2015-04-21 11:23:01 2
  • ps and grep is a dangerous combination -- grep tries to match everything on each line (thus the all too common: grep -v grep hack). ps -C doesn't use grep, it uses the process table for an exact match. Thus, you'll get an accurate list with: ps -fC sh rather finding every process with sh somewhere on the line. Show Sample Output


    14
    ps -fC PROCESSNAME
    pooderbill · 2015-04-20 13:09:44 2
  • The shortest and most complete comment/blank line remover... Any line where the first non-whitespace character is # (ie, indented # comments), and all null and blank lines are removed. Use the alias as a filter: noc /etc/hosts or grep server /etc/hosts | noc Change to nawk depending awk versions. Show Sample Output


    1
    alias noc="awk 'NF && ! /^[[:space:]]*#/'"
    pooderbill · 2014-09-07 00:50:57 0

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Test file system type before further commands execution
Exclude 400 client hosts with NFS auto-mounted home directories. Easily modified for inclusion in your scripts.

add all files not under version control to repository
With the force options the same results can be achieved

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Export a directory to all clients via NFSv4, read/write.
This exports a directory to the world in read/write mode. It is useful for quick, temporary NFS exports. Consider restricting the clients to a subnet or to specific hosts for security reasons (the client can be specified before the colon). On the client: mount -t nfs4 hostname:/ /mountpoint To terminate all of the exports (after unmounting on the client): exportfs -u -a Leave out the fsid=0 option if you don't want NFSv4. This works under recent versions of Linux.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

What is my public IP address
Clean output, if used in scripts: $ GET checkip.dyndns.org|grep -o '[0-9]\{1,3\}\.[0-9]\{1,3\}\.[0-9]\{1,3\}\.[0-9]\{1,3\}' or $ GET icanhazip.com

Open a manpage in the default (graphical) web browser
An easy alias for opening a manpage, nicely HTML formatted, in your set internet browser. If you get a "command exited with status 3" error you need to install groff.

display an embeded help message from bash script header
With this one liner you can easily output a standard help message using the following convention: Usage: is the start marker Stop at the last #

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Text graphing ping output filter
Nasty perl one-liner that provides a sparkline of ping times. If you want a different history than the last 30, just put that value in. It (ab)uses unicode to draw the bars, inspired by https://github.com/joemiller/spark-ping . It's not the most bug-free piece of code, but what it lacks in robustness it makes up for in capability. :) If anyone has any ideas on how to make it more compact or better, I'd love to hear them. I included a ping to google in the command just as an example (and burned up 10 chars doing it!). You should use it with: $ ping example.com | $SPARKLINE_PING_COMMAND


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