Search for a process by name

ps -fC PROCESSNAME
ps and grep is a dangerous combination -- grep tries to match everything on each line (thus the all too common: grep -v grep hack). ps -C doesn't use grep, it uses the process table for an exact match. Thus, you'll get an accurate list with: ps -fC sh rather finding every process with sh somewhere on the line.
Sample Output
# ps -fC sshd
UID        PID  PPID  C STIME TTY          TIME CMD
root      3530     1  0  2014 ?        00:00:00 /usr/sbin/sshd
root      3573  3530  0 08:21 ?        00:00:00 sshd: root@pts/0

14
2015-04-20 13:09:44

3 Alternatives + Submit Alt

  • Function that searchs a process by its name and shows in the terminal. * Shows the Header for reference * Hides the process 'grep' from the list * Case sensitive Show Sample Output


    -1
    psg(){ ps aux | grep -v grep | egrep -e "$1|USER"; }
    ivanalejandro0 · 2014-12-31 22:27:27 1
  • Function that searchs for process by its name: * Shows the Header for reference * Hides the process 'grep' from the list * Case sensitive The typical problem with using "ps | grep" is that the grep process shows up the in the output. The usual solution is to search for "[p]attern" instead of "pattern". This function turns the parameter into just such a [p]attern. ${1:0:1} is the first character of $1 . ${1:1} is characters 2-end of $1 Show Sample Output


    -2
    psg(){ ps aux | grep -E "[${1:0:1}]${1:1}|^USER"; }
    flatcap · 2015-01-01 00:12:45 0
  • David thanks for that grep inside! here is mine version: psgrep() { case ${1} in ( -E | -e ) local EXTENDED_REGEXP=1 shift 1 ;; *) local EXTENDED_REGEXP=0 ;; esac if [[ -z ${*} ]] then echo "psgrep - grep for process(es) by keyword" >&2 echo "Usage: psgrep [-E|-e] ... " >&2 echo "" >&2 echo "option [-E|-e] enables full extended regexp support" >&2 echo "without [-E|-e] plain strings are looked for" >&2 return 1 fi \ps -eo 'user,pid,pcpu,command' w | head -n1 local ARG='' if (( ${EXTENDED_REGEXP} == 0 )) then while (( ${#} > 0 )) do ARG="${1}" shift 1 local STRING=${ARG} local LENGTH=$(expr length ${STRING}) local FIRSCHAR=$(echo $(expr substr ${STRING} 1 1)) local REST=$(echo $(expr substr ${STRING} 2 ${LENGTH})) \ps -eo 'user,pid,pcpu,command' w | grep "[${FIRSCHAR}]${REST}" done else \ps -eo 'user,pid,pcpu,command' w | grep -iE "(${*})" fi }


    -10
    psgrep() ... func to long, please look under "description"
    Xk2c · 2015-01-01 02:58:48 0

What Others Think

Note that the match *does* have to be exact... for example if you are looking for your mysql DB server process, ps -fC mysql" won't find it, because the process name is mysqld.
dmmst19 · 178 weeks and 5 days ago
>> mysql* Correct. An exact match is the primary feature of this construct. This is designed for admins that want to kill the Bourne shell processes "sh". With the ps|grep method, all ksh, bash, csh, hashdaemon, ssh and sshd processes will also be killed along with anything containing 'sh' on the arg list.
pooderbill · 178 weeks and 5 days ago

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