ls -s | sort -nr | more

find large files


1
By: miccaman
2009-06-18 06:44:01

These Might Interest You

  • Starting with a large MySQL dump file (*.sql) remove any lines that have inserts for the specified table. Sometimes one or two tables are very large and uneeded, eg. log tables. To exclude multiple tables you can get fancy with sed, or just run the command again on subsequently generated files.


    1
    sed '/INSERT INTO `unwanted_table`/d' mydb.sql > reduced.sql
    sudopeople · 2016-06-24 20:13:47 0
  • shortest alternative without the speed-o-meter"xclip large.xml" "xclip -o" to get the clipboard content, alternatively [shift key] + insert or middle button of your mouse.


    5
    pv large.xml | xclip
    marssi · 2009-07-08 19:26:12 0
  • avoid mouse abuse and the constant struggle of balancing scroll velocity ... not to mention that burning sensation in your upper right shoulder ....


    -1
    cat large.xml | xclip
    copremesis · 2009-07-08 16:30:07 3
  • I don't like doing a massive sort on all the directory names just to get a small set of them. the above shows a sorted list of all directories over 1GB. use head as well if you want. du's "-x" flag limits this to one file system. That's mostly useful when you run it on "/" but don't want "/proc" and "/dev" and so forth. Remember though that it will also exclude "/home" or "/var" if those are separate partitions. the "-a" option is often useful too, for listing large files as well as large directories. Might be slower.


    0
    du -mx [directory] | grep -P '^\d{4}' | sort -rn
    mc0e · 2013-05-24 09:52:41 0
  • Should work even when very large files exist.


    4
    tree -isafF /var|grep -v "/$"|tr '[]' ' '|sort -k1nr|head
    knoppix5 · 2016-05-27 16:41:20 6
  • Thanks to flatcap for optimizing this command. This command takes advantage of the ext4 filesystem's resistance to fragmentation. By using this command, files that were previously fragmented will be copied / deleted / pasted essentially giving the filesystem another chance at saving the file contiguously. ( unlike FAT / NTFS, the *nix filesystem always try to save a file without fragmenting it ) My command only effects the home directory and only those files with your R/W (read / write ) permissions. There are two issues with this command: 1. it really won't help, it works, but linux doesn't suffer much (if any ) fragmentation and even fragmented files have fast I/O 2. it doesn't discriminate between fragmented and non-fragmented files, so a large ~/ directory with no fragments will take almost as long as an equally sized fragmented ~/ directory The benefits i managed to work into the command: 1. it only defragments files under 16mb, because a large file with fragments isn't as noticeable as a small file that's fragmented, and copy/ delete/ paste of large files would take too long 2. it gives a nice countdown in the terminal so you know how far how much progress is being made and just like other defragmenters you can stop at any time ( use ctrl+c ) 3. fast! i can defrag my ~/ directory in 11 seconds thanks to the ramdrive powering the command's temporary storage bottom line: 1. its only an experiment, safe ( i've used it several times for testing ), but probably not very effective ( unless you somehow have a fragmentation problem on linux ). might be a placebo for recent windows converts looking for a defrag utility on linux and won't accept no for an answer 2. it's my first commandlinefu command Show Sample Output


    2
    find ~ -maxdepth 20 -type f -size -16M -print > t; for ((i=$(wc -l < t); i>0; i--)) do a=$(sed -n ${i}p < t); mv "$a" /dev/shm/d; mv /dev/shm/d "$a"; echo $i; done; echo DONE; rm t
    LinuxMan · 2010-07-07 04:29:22 6

What Others Think

Or if you prefer KB, rather than file system blocks: du -sk * | sort -nr | more Or the top ten du -sk * | sort -n | tail -10 Note that this will summarise directory total sizes too.
unixmonkey3280 · 465 weeks and 6 days ago
You can do this with 'ls' by itself as well: ls -hrs Or, if you like to see "8" instead of "8.0K", you can use it like this: ls -hrs --block-size=1024
unixmonkey4369 · 465 weeks and 5 days ago
Never parse ls: http://mywiki.wooledge.org/ParsingLs
dennisw · 465 weeks and 1 day ago

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Any thoughts on this command? Does it work on your machine? Can you do the same thing with only 14 characters?

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